Search Results: "Kenzaburo Oe"


BOOK REVIEW

A HEALING FAMILY by Kenzaburo Oe
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"A lovely book, low-key, avoiding easy sentimentality, honest to a fault. (First printing of 50,000)"
Oe's (The Silent Cry, 1975, etc.) first new book since his 1994 Nobel Prize for Literature is a slender memoir returning to a familiar subject, his brain-injured son. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A QUIET LIFE by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Imperfect work, then, but, still, a welcome building-block in the ungainly structure that is Oe's utterly distinctive and compelling oeuvre. (Author tour)"
This 1990 novel by the 1994 Nobel-winner fictionalizes publicly known facts about Oe's personal life: specifically, the story of his adult son Hikari, hopelessly brain-damaged yet possessed of a remarkable intuitive gift that has brought him fame and success as a composer of some highly original music. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMERSAULT by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2003

"Oe (Rouse Up, O Young Men of the New Age, 2002, etc.) is a deeply flawed great writer, and Somersault, alas, is not one of his triumphs."
An intriguing but enormously overinflated 1999 novel, Oe's first original fiction since receiving a 1994 Nobel Prize, concerns an austere, embattled, and eventually self-destructive religious cult. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH BY WATER by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"In other words, it's vintage Oe: provocative, doubtful without being cynical, elegant without being precious."
Pensive novel, at once autobiographical and philosophical, by Nobel Prize-winner Oe (The Changeling, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROUSE UP, O YOUNG MEN OF THE NEW AGE by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

"Oe has been afflicted, and blessed, with a great theme that's entirely his own—and has made it the cornerstone of an irresistibly compelling body of work."
Perhaps the best of several fictionalizations of life with his brain-damaged son Hikari, this moving 1986 novel (previously untranslated into English) by Japan's 1994 Nobel laureate ranks with such triumphs as Oe's The Silent Cry (1975) and Teach Us to Outgrow Our Madness (1969). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIP THE BUDS, SHOOT THE KIDS by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"More shaded, more graphic, and angrier than Lord of the Flies, but the fierce anger is transmuted by Oe's art into literary gold- -an anguished plea for tolerance more wrenching than any rant could ever be. (First serial to Grand Street; author tour)"
First American publication of 1994 Nobelist Oe's 1958 debut novel: a fiercely intense, unsparingly realistic chronicle of the cruelties visited on the deviant and the different. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ECHO OF HEAVEN by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 6, 1996

"Not a fully achieved work of fiction, but, still, an impressively dramatic specimen of the contemporary didactic novel, a genre that Oe has elevated by impressing upon it so powerfully his own personal history and sensibility."
The 1994 Nobelist's most recent novel (after Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids, 1995) is a tense meditation on the life of a stricken woman whose sufferings and subsequent transformation linger hauntingly in the memory of the narrator entrusted with her story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIROSHIMA NOTES by Kenzaburo Oe
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Disappointing overall, considering who the author is, but the first essay in the collection is essential reading."
Reissued with a new introduction by the author for the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Nobel Prize winner Oe's 19635 ruminations on the Atomic Age are still timely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHANGELING by Kenzaburo Oe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2010

"Kogito, ergo sum. He thinks and remembers and imagines. Therefore, he is."
Once again introspection and autobiography are transmuted into compelling fiction in the latest from Japan's 1994 Nobel laureate (Somersault, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >