Search Results: "Kevin Egan"


BOOK REVIEW

MIDNIGHT by Kevin Egan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 2, 2013

"A crystalline noir nightmare built on the premise that yes, things can always, always, always get worse."
A pair of court employees can hold onto their jobs for another year—if only they can hide the news of their boss's death for 24 hours. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSING PIECE by Kevin Egan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 14, 2015

"Not as brilliantly focused as Egan's nightmarish debut (Midnight, 2013) but just as welcome in its more ambitious, wide-ranging way."
The New York County Courthouse at 60 Centre St. becomes the site of a world-class legal and extralegal struggle for a priceless group of antiquities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROASTED PEANUTS by Tim Egan
by Tim Egan, illustrated by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: April 3, 2006

"Dead-pan humor with a pitch-perfect aim. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sam and Jackson love to sit and watch baseball at Grant's Field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRIAL OF CARDIGAN JONES by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Not Egan at his best, though this may have some potential as a discussion starter on the idea of 'innocent until proven guilty.' (Picture book. 6-8)"
Only hints of the deadpan humor that made Egan's Serious Farm (2003) and other tales so droll come through here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIDAY NIGHT AT HODGES' CAFE by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"One of the most exceptional and offbeat stories in some time. (Picture book. 4-8)"
It's Friday Night at Hodges' Cafe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DODSWORTH IN TOKYO by Tim Egan
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 16, 2013

"The poetics of restraint could not be better displayed. (Early reader. 6-9)"
Timing is everything. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNT TOAST ON DAVENPORT STREET by Tim Egan
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1997

"Home is where the burnt toast is in this original and zany offering. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Stella and Arthur, a couple of dogs, live on Davenport Street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHESTNUT COVE by Tim Egan
by Tim Egan, illustrated by Tim Egan
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1995

"As with his earlier work, Egan demonstrates why he is a rare bird: thoughtful, disarming, charming, and eccentric. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another splendid tale from Egan (Friday Night at Hodges' Cafe, 1994), cautionary but with the accent squarely on the story line. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DODSWORTH IN NEW YORK by Tim Egan
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 24, 2007

"Stay tuned. (Easy reader. 6-8)"
Egan brings back characters from Friday Night at Hodges' Café (1994) and The Pink Refrigerator (April 2007) for a typically tongue-in-cheek outing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"Lucent prose illuminates a man obscured for years in history's shadows."
New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Egan (The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America, 2009, etc.) returns with the story of the astonishing life of Edward Curtis (1868-1952), whose photographs of American Indians now command impressive prices at auction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 3, 2016

"An occasionally humorous, definitely informative look at what Americans eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and all those snack times in between and how our eating habits are changing who we are."
How American food habits have changed over time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMERALD CITY by Jennifer Egan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"The lure of adventure and the lust for wealth in Egan's schematic little fictions are just yuppie fantasies; she seldom gets beyond the clichÇs of money and personal crisis."
The author of the novel The Invisible Circus (1994) collects 11 somewhat strained stories that seem suited to the glossy venues in which they first appeared (e.g., GQ and Mademoiselle): They're slick if utterly predictable lifestyle studies that entertain very conventional notions of conformity and wildness. Read full book review >