Search Results: "Kim Barnes"


BOOK REVIEW

IN THE WILDERNESS by Kim Barnes
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 1996

"This is also a book about humility, and how one is of one's origins, no matter how far a person has traveled in imagination, artistry, and insight."
A poet's sad and beautiful memoir about growing up in Idaho logging country, in the complicated bosom of a fundamentalist Christian family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE KINGDOM OF MEN by Kim Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2012

"Barnes writes poetically and intensely about personal conflict and subtly informs the reader about continuing Western misunderstandings of Middle Eastern culture."
When her husband Mason gets a job with Aramco, Oklahoman Gin McPhee moves from small-town life to a wider—and wilder—world of privilege, corruption and Middle Eastern geopolitics in the 1960s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 7, 2012

"An unusual concept and strong characters shine through stilted writing and unbelievable plot devices."
Accomplished business writer Barnes (Consulting on the Inside, 2011, etc.) makes her first foray into mystery, with murder, mergers and mayhem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A COUNTRY CALLED HOME by Kim Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2008

"Resonant with themes of longing and loss, but too self-conscious for its own good."
Poet/memoirist Barnes' second novel (Finding Caruso, 2003) traces the impact of a young couple's impetuous decision to seek a new life in Idaho. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING CARUSO by Kim Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 24, 2003

"A standard coming-of-ager, told in a polished if somewhat precious voice ('I abide in the whisper of wind through an old mare's bones') that sounds more evocative of Greenwich Village than Idaho."
A Brontë-esque debut novel about wretched families, childhood grief, love and betrayal, by poet and memoirist Barnes (Hungry for the World, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 21, 2006

"Like a visit with very honest, very smart friends."
Wide-ranging essays about being female and middle-aged, collected by memoirist Barnes (Hungry for the World, 2000, etc.) and novelist Davis (Winter Range, 2000, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 12, 1994

"Contributors include Tess Gallagher, Marilynne Robinson, Pam Houston, and Terry Tempest Williams. (Author tour)"
The landscape and culture of the American West has long been associated with reticent, leathery-skinned men. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLYAWAY by Lesley Barnes
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 7, 2016

"Towers and stairways and lots of curlicues will intrigue some viewers, but this sweet concoction of a gift book may have a limited audience. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Feeding the princess craze, this lift-the flap book features a young royal whose bird with beautiful singing voice breaks free from its cage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APOSTROPHES AND APOCALYPSES by John Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 20, 1998

"Concerns that in Barnes's fine novels may be assets, or minor flaws—density; limited originality; pedestrian writing—become problems in the shorter format; annoying, too, is the presumption of a largely teenaged audience."
Barnes's first collection, comprising 13 stories, including four previously unpublished, and eight essays, is divided, obscurely, into sections headed "While you Wait," "For the End," "Let Us Spend some Time," and "Talking to People Who Aren't There." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METROLAND by Julian Barnes
Released: June 6, 1980

But much here, mostly in 16-year-old Chris' very specific, special world, is amusing, crisp, and evocative for readers tuned to the British/literary wavelength. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALTHILL by Judith Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2002

"An overwrought style that never lets up, and a first-novelist who can't resist romantic metaphors (eyes are like 'lapis lazuli,' hair is 'berry-dark' and 'berry-sweet,' etc.). Just too much."
Galloping melodrama about a tormented horse-trainer. Read full book review >