Search Results: "Kingsley Amis"


BOOK REVIEW

MEMOIRS by Kingsley Amis
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Depthless, but the pace and variety will keep many awake."
Amis's "autobiography"—or, more accurately—portraits of his acquaintances after a few opening chapters on his family, school days, and life at Oxford. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW OXFORD BOOK OF LIGHT VERSE by Kingsley Amis
Released: June 1, 1978

"So: a strongly flavored selection, sparkling and accomplished and sedulously unserious, to supplement (but not supplant) Auden's more lingering measures."
"Anon. is not my favorite poet," writes K. Amis, butting against the first Oxford Book of Light Verse (1938) compiled by W. H. Auden, which includes anonymous ballads, folk songs, and nursery rhymes right along with the poems of Chaucer-to-Byron-to-Betjeman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAKE A GIRL LIKE YOU by Kingsley Amis
Released: Feb. 22, 1960

"Those looking for the expected satire and humor will find little of either — or much else to admire."
Young Jenny Bunn comes to infant-teach outside of London and is quite determined to lose the narrow-minded ideas of her north country home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT UNCERTAIN FEELING by Kingsley Amis
Released: Feb. 23, 1955

"It's not a sure bet that British acclaim — and vanguard American criticism will overcome that uncertain American market."
A second book from one of the young English novelists (Lucky Jim was the first) continues his prodding of pomp and many circumstances, of upper class apings and ossified institutionalism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ALTERATION by Kingsley Amis
Released: Jan. 20, 1976

"Too precious to take seriously (however genuine the anti-clerical anger) and too leaden to embrace."
The English Reformation never was. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JAMES BOND DOSSIER by Kingsley Amis
Released: June 29, 1965

"As such, it's an entertaining exegesis of the compleat Bond for the compleat collector thereof."
To Fleming- With Admiration, as one of the "demi-giants" who like Jules Verne or Conan Doyle left an unmistakable imprint on the story of action/intrigue, this critique of his total OEUVRE in the face of many detractors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 7, 1965

"Most of the characters are faceless but one of them could be Peter Sellers."
The Egyptologists are the members of the Metropolitan Egyptological Society housed in London, and just what goes on or comes off in the Isis Room is not revealed until the end of this long legpull. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPECTRUM V by Kingsley Amis
Released: March 22, 1967

"The authors represented are F.L. Wallace, Walter M. Miller, Raymond F. Jones, James H. Schmitz, Tom Godwin, Theodore L. Thomas, Paul Ash and Richard Ashby."
The fifth in a popular, intelligent series this contains eight short science fiction stories all ending, happily enough on an optimistic note. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 29, 1964

"An eminent cast of contributors here — Theodore Sturgeon; J.G. Ballard; Poul Anderson; Mark Rose, Peter Phillips; Murray Leinster; Alfred Bester; and Arthur C. Clarke — are an assurance of literate entertainment."
This third anthology of stories and novellas projects a good deal of the new phenomenology through skyscapes from here to the moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1990

"Lots of wonderfully gratuitous gibes at Amis' familiar betes noires brighten an already luminous work."
One of modern literature's greatest curmudgeons appears to be going soft in his old age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RUSSIAN GIRL by Kingsley Amis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Vintage Amis — as divisive, compelling, and hilarious as the Bobbitt trial."
As pleasantly cantankerous as ever, the venerable Kingsley Amis (We Are All Guilty, 1992) once again casts his gimlet eye on the vanities of the age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENDING UP by Kingsley Amis
Released: Sept. 25, 1974

"One of the self-defeating aspects of Mr. Amis' book — if it is to be a commentary on the incompetence-incontinence of old age — is that he has gathered together such an unsightly group of characters who must easily have been as unattractive at thirty or forty or fifty."
When all is said and done, Mr. Amis and his readers should all be ready to make voluntary contributions to the Euthanasia Society although there are no suggestions to that effect here. Read full book review >