Search Results: "Kirkpatrick Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR OF MISS AGNES by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"A quiet, yet satisfying account. (Fiction. 9-11)"
In 1948 the unorthodox Miss Agnes arrives to teach the children of an Athabascan Indian Village in remote Alaska. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINTER CAMP by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 29, 1993

"The outcome is never really in doubt here, but the portrayal of these competent, courageous children battling the intense cold is compelling. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Again, two young Athabascan Indians, Toughboy and Sister (1990), survive the rigors of the Alaskan wilderness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCING AT THE ODINOCHKA by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"However, the author's works for a bit younger audience, such as The Year of Miss Agnes (2000), are more compelling reading. (maps, author's note, bibliography) (Fiction. 9-14)"
One hundred and fifty years ago, Alaska belonged to Russia and was called Russian America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DO NOT PASS GO by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 23, 2007

"Still, this powerful character study, where everyone in Deet's family grows, shows that Hill has a gift for quietly but realistically portraying the journey. (Fiction. 9-14)"
Deet's parents are happy-go-lucky and financially irresponsible, so he compensates by being compulsively organized and extremely judgmental. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BO AT BALLARD CREEK by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2013

"Some may find this overly sweet, but Bo is an endearing Pollyanna in a parka. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
A warm tale set in an Alaskan gold-mining town in 1929-30. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BO AT IDITAROD CREEK by Kirkpatrick Hill
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"Overall, another warm and charming outing, and the family's move to a different town and larger, permanent home is a satisfying ending—though Bo's ever changing family dynamic may summon another sequel. (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
This sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek (2013) continues the adventures of the 5-year-old gamine and her "two papas," Alaskan gold miners in the late 1920s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HILL by Jean Giono
by Jean Giono, translated by Paul Eprile
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Though this novel is nearly 90 years old, its sharp focus and uncompromising storytelling leave it feeling hauntingly timeless—a story of primal conflicts erupting into seemingly pastoral landscapes."
In this newly translated 1929 novel, a small community in Provence is forced to contend with internal strife and environmental catastrophes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 17, 1991

"Loosely joined, dulled by a siege mentality, and overstuffed with excerpts from UN meetings—but nevertheless an informed view of the neoconservative mind-set in American diplomatic circles during Reagan's first term."
A firsthand account of the perils of American diplomacy at the UN during Jeane Kirkpatrick's tenure, written from Gerson's position as her expert in international law. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Lords Hill by Maggie Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"A profound meditation on the overcoming of past trauma."
In this unflinchingly candid memoir, debut author Miller recounts a childhood of abuse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUGAR HILL by Carole Boston Weatherford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2014

"A fine tribute to the local color of Sugar Hill, who have made America a better and more interesting country for almost a century. (Informational picture book. 7-9)"
Weatherford's poetic, swinging textual rhythms meet Christie's artistic razzmatazz to create one hot picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROSPECT HILL by Richard Francis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 15, 2004

"A veddy British story for fans of Amis père et fils, Malcolm Bradbury, and even Dickens. Nicely done."
Life is a series of accidents—that just gets weirder when you throw in politics. Read full book review >