Search Results: "L. Neil Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

SMITH by Leon Garfield
Released: Sept. 1, 1967

"More Hogarth than Cruikshank, this lacks the gusto of Devil in the Fog (1966) but readers who respond to the author will follow him here."
"Smith. 'unted, 'ounded, 'omeless, and part gin-sodder. Smith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMERICAN ZONE by L. Neil Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"For fans only."
Lamely comic sequel to Probability Broach (not reviewed) has hard-drinking, big-eating, pistol-packing, Colorado good-ol'-boy p.i. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRETTA MARTYN by L. Neil Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Noteworthy for its increasingly batty attempts to transplant old-time windjammer swashbuckling into space, and a political subtext that drones in the background like a half-heard but annoying chuckle."
More space-pirate folderol, following Henry Martyn (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PALLAS by L. Neil Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"This is just the beginning of a plot that takes in family entanglements, revolutions, alien objects, immortality treatments, etc. Reasonably diverting, if you can tolerate Smith's unsubtle ideological slant, and fluffed up with references to Star Wars, Star Trek, and other cultural icons."
Something like a playful, knowing, Heinlein-ish Little House in the asteroid belt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORGE OF THE ELDERS by L. Neil Smith
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 2000

"Smith's ideas are amusing if unsubtle—with spaceships called McCain, Hatch, Dole, etc., he wears his ideology on his sleeve—though fans should find diversion here."
In an alternate world where Marxism triumphed, astronauts from the American Soviet Socialist Republic and their Russian colleagues explore space and encounter dinosaurs, giant capitalist cockroaches, robots, nautiloids, talking dogs, etc. Seems that the brilliant but mysteriously dim-witted Elders blazed a trail in probing probability worlds and multiple realities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE SMITH by Michael Coveney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"An authoritative and perceptive portrait."
The illustrious career of "a great stage actress in both comedy and tragedy, and an international film star." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEIL ARMSTRONG by Jay Barbree
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2014

"A wholly admiring assessment of Armstrong the aviator and Armstrong the man."
A longtime NBC News space correspondent looks back on the aviation career of the first man to set foot on the moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTI SMITH by Victor Bockris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"But she and her many fans deserve better than this sometimes sensationalistic, second-hand account of her life."
Lou Reed and Keith Richards biographer Bockris offers the first full-length portrait of —70s rock icon Patti Smith, a woman whose charismatic live shows and uncompromising music earned her the moniker "The High Priestess of Punk." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA SMITH by Stephanie Barden
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2011

"Though the first-person narration sounds a little too close to the voice of Sara Pennypacker's Clementine, the richness of this new friendship and the gentle resolution will make readers hope for another installment. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Cinderella Smith cannot keep track of her shoes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH SMITH by Richard Lyman Bushman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2005

"More complete but less evenhanded than Robert Remini's Joseph Smith (2002); some readers may find parts of Bushman's narrative to be overly credulous."
Orthodox life of the decidedly unorthodox Joseph Smith, founder and prophet of Mormonism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >