Search Results: "Lan Hua"


BOOK REVIEW

Wah-Say-Lan: Seneca Warrior by James Herbert Smith
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Solid historical fiction dedicated to historical accuracy, sometimes at the expense of rip-roaring storytelling."
Smith (Wah-Say-Lan: A Tale of the Iroquois in the American Revolution, 2009) braids together historical fact and fiction in this YA version of a tale he's spun before as a novel—one that's full of passion, romance, loss, and carefully researched historical information.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SONG OF MU LAN by Jeanne M. Lee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Lee creates a powerful and distinctive mooda product of spare imagery, elegant repetitions, and use of the present tense to describe the distant pastthat makes for an affecting read- aloud. (Picture book/folklore. 4-9)"
A beautiful translation of a sixth-century Chinese folk poem about Mu Lan, a woman who spends more than a decade in the emperor's army disguised as a man and returns home a hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINA'S BRAVEST GIRL by Charlie Chin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 1993

"Arai's art is colorful and decorative. (Folklore/Picture book. 5-10)"
A bilingual presentation of a fifth-century Chinese legend, adapted from a poem recorded hundreds of years later during the Soong Dynasty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOTUS AND THE STORM by Lan Cao
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 2014

"A novel that humanizes the war in a way that body counts and political analyses never will."
Written with acute psychological insight and poetic flair, this deeply moving novel illuminates the ravages of war as experienced by a South Vietnamese family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 16, 2013

"A suspect, although thought-provoking, alternative to Western-style wellness treatments that may contain the kernels of good advice."
A modern-day proponent of ancient Taoism provides a regimen that aims to dramatically extend one's life span. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY BRIDGE by Lan Cao
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1997

A wonderfully written but unengaging first novel about a young Vietnamese refugee who, in 1975, is airlifted from Saigon and only later learns of her family's dark past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REMOTE COUNTRY OF WOMEN by Bai Hua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1994

"A lyrical work, both tragic and uplifting."
Two people's vastly different experiences during the Cultural Revolution are the subject of this beautiful, sad novel by an internationally renowned Chinese writer and dissident not previously published in English. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO LIVE by Yu Hua
by Yu Hua, translated by Michael Berry
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 2003

"Yu Hua is an internationally celebrated author, but this English version of his work doesn't tell us why."
A Chinese Everyman's progress from self-indulgent irresponsibility to resignation and the beginning of wisdom is briskly in a 1993 novel known in other parts of the world as the source of the highly successful film. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNGER by Lan Samantha Chang
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"The debut of a writer possessing a distinctive, fresh imagination and voice. (Author tour)"
A wonderfully written debut collection focusing on Chinese immigrants to America and the troubled lives of their children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 29, 2000

"Hu was faced with the classic difficulty of portraying the true dimensions of powerful virtue: Unfortunately, the bare facts of Vautrin's life convey her stature far better than this heartfelt but somewhat pedestrian account."
An account of the remarkable courage of an American missionary who lived through the rape of Nanking, by award-winning Chinese academic Hu (History/National Univ. of Taiwan). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHINA IN TEN WORDS by Yu Hua
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 8, 2011

"More engaging than profound, Yu Hua's essays say much about the continuing enigma that is China."
Acclaimed Chinese novelist Yu Hua (Brothers, 2010, etc.) offers a series of essays that combine memoir and trenchant social critique. Read full book review >