Search Results: "Larry Gonick"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTOON GUIDE TO CALCULUS by Larry Gonick
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2012

"This is no idiot's guide to math, but it could be useful as a supplement to a standard course in calculus."
A tour of calculus from the polymath whose illustrated guides have illuminated a wide range of subjects, from genetics and sex to the environment and the universe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Despite his lefty, multi-culty inclinations, Gonick maintains the high level of sophistication, skepticism, and just plain fun established by the first volume."
Imagine a collaboration between Arnold Toynbee and R. Crumb and you get a pretty good idea of Gonick's clever and ambitious comic book series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ATTACK OF THE SMART PIES by Larry Gonick
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2005

"Sporting an array of odd forms in the tiny vignettes with which this tale is sprinkled, the New Muses may keep their current fans amused, but they're unlikely to draw many new ones with this offbeat episode. (Fantasy. 9-11)"
A zany premise and an equally off-the-wall plot keep this wandering tale—the first separate outing for characters with a regular gig in MUSE magazine—afloat, but just barely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 2, 2018

"Something to leave under the tree for that relative who can't get enough of Ayn Rand, insistent that there are values to cherish other than selfishness."
"Overeducated cartoonist" Gonick, the pen behind numerous cartoon guides to scientific and historical subjects (The Cartoon History of the Universe, etc.), returns with this look at the reigning economic system of the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PEBOAN AND SEEGWUN by Charles Larry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 20, 1993

"Afterword. (Folklore/Picture book. 6-10)"
An Anishinabe (Ojibwa) riddle/myth about the turning seasons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO HELL WITH HONOR by Larry Sklenar
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2000

"However, committed lay readers and serious students of the event and the surrounding Victorianexpansionist milieu will probably find this an engaging, convincing, and fully informative account, one which will stand out in the crowded field of Custerrelated books."
A remarkably detailed and reconstructed account of the era and events surrounding the Seventh Cavalry's infamous loss under General George Armstrong Custer that largely succeeds in ameliorating the General's equally infamous culpability by exploring the gray areas and forgotten facts of this archetypical American disaster. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A ONCE PERFECT PLACE by Larry Maness
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Decent but uneven—with some distinctive village-character touches, a blandly brave hero (with a Lassie-like super-dog as sidekick), and a few intriguing toxic-waste details."
Cambridge, Mass., shamus Jake Eaton (Nantucket Revenge, 1995) is hired by imperious Mildreth Gibbon Preston to figure out what's going on up in Winslow, New Hampshire—where Mrs. Preston has just given the state 20,000 acres of pristine forest and mountain as a memorial to her late husband Oliver, a Nobel laureate and ``founder of the modern environmental movement.'' Specifically: Why has Colin Owens, the aerial surveyor assigned to do a flyover of the land, mysteriously disappeared? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RAINBOW MARS by Larry Niven
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 19, 1999

"A brilliantly conceived, funny, exciting, nail-biting, heart-warming jaunt through weird and wonderful histories that never were."
Almost 30 years ago, Niven (the splendid Destiny's Road, 1997, etc.) wrote a handful of stories featuring Hanville Svetz of the Institute for Temporal Research. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ENEMY WITHIN by Larry Bond
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 15, 1996

"A triple-A Bond."
The ripsnorting, all-too-plausible latest from bestselling Bond (Cauldron, 1993, etc.) pits a duo of dynamic Americans against a mad Iranian bent on altering the geopolitical balance of power. Read full book review >