Search Results: "Larry Hancock"


BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2007

"Let the casting begin. (Fantasy. 10-12)"
Familiar tropes get turned on their furry little ears in this barbed, video-ready rock-and-roll tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SURPRISE ATTACK by Larry Hancock
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A timely, pertinent study emphasizing the fact that when it comes to military or terrorist attacks, 'there are always warnings.'"
A valuable examination of U.S. national security crises past and present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANCOCK PARK  by Isabel Kaplan
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2009

"Neither light enough to live up to its Hollywood-style cover and flap copy nor serious enough to compete with the likes of more literary problem novels, this is a forgettable, superficial, all-around disappointment. (Fiction. YA)"
Despite her glitzy surroundings, Los Angeles junior Becky is plagued by troubles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERBIE HANCOCK by Herbie Hancock
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A warm, inspiring book by a man who seems to have little ego despite a career spent near the peak of his art. Recommended reading for jazz aficionados."
One of the most innovative and admired jazz musicians of his generation reminisces about his career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANCOCK PARK by Katherine V. Forrest
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 4, 2004

"A skillfully extended short story saddled with the additional problem that very few criminal trials whose defendants aren't OJ are all about the cops, even when they're as engaging as Kate."
Kate Delafield (Sleeping Bones, 1999, etc.) goes up against a high-priced lawyer determined to get his client acquitted by attacking her police work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOST LARRY by Graham Nunn
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2012

"Clean, simple, seamless—just right for the nursery-school set or children with special needs. (iPad storybook/dexterity app. 1-3)"
A little green lizard will trail a fingertip home in this mini-Odyssey, the third of Larry's interactive outings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG LARRY by Daniel Pinkwater
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"The illustrator's arctic landscapes are unusual and pleasing, and though her animals are barely sketched, they convey the bulk of the bears as well as their human-like postures and their playfulness. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The Pinkwaters (Wallpaper from Space, 1996, etc.) combine facts and hilarious fancy, enriched by the author's knack for turning a phrase. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIMELIGHT LARRY by Leigh Hodgkinson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"Prereaders should be captivated by this cacophony of type and images, and they will certainly identify with the willful peacock. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Larry the peacock finds adventure in... his very own book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLEEPOVER LARRY by Daniel Pinkwater
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Polar bears, you know, love to dance: 'Floy doy, floy doy, floy doy.' (Picture book. 3-8)"
The Pinkwaters bring back Larry the polar bear, veteran of much foolishness and fan of blueberry muffins and cod pizza. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DANCING LARRY by Daniel Pinkwater
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"The ridiculousness is broadened by Jill Pinkwater's pen-and-ink artwork: Larry was clearly born to legwarmers, and Madame Swoboda is a smoky vision straight from Central Europe. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The Pinkwaters' Larry is a polar bear of many parts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JOHN HANCOCK CLUB by Louise Borden
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 26, 2007

"A good addition to themes on school. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Borden's latest school-related book tackles the excitement and nervousness that surrounds every third-grader learning to write in cursive. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOW WARFARE by Larry Hancock
NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2014

"Readers who care about the intentions of the Founders and the niceties of human rights will come away depressed by this grim yet trenchant portrait of American imperial reach—and overreach."
Congress declares war, right? Constitutionally, yes—but, as intelligence analysts Hancock and Wexler (The Awful Grace of God: Religious Terrorism, White Supremacy, and the Unsolved Murder of Martin Luther King, Jr., 2012) write, there's a reason it doesn't. Read full book review >