Search Results: "Laura Hulbert"


BOOK REVIEW

WHO HAS THESE FEET? by Laura Hulbert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 16, 2011

"Young animal fans will find much to enjoy and are sure to ask for multiple readings. (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
Who has these feet and what do they do? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO HAS THIS TAIL? by Laura Hulbert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A great challenge for kids who have already mastered the basic pets and farm animals. (Informational picture book. 3-7)"
Hulbert and Brooks' second pairing (Who Has These Feet?, 2011) sets readers to identifying animals by their tails and learning how those tails help them adapt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OFF THE CHARTS by Ann Hulbert
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2018

"A persuasive argument for nurturing 'childhood normalcy' even for the stunningly gifted and talented."
A journalist vividly portrays the positive and negative impacts of being a child prodigy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 5, 1992

"If Stafford herself couldn't quite make art's silk purse out of life's sow's ear, neither can Hulbert's not very compelling book."
Hulbert, a New Republic editor, here writes uphill: Like many a woman writer, Jean Stafford was defined more by the male company she kept (her failed-writer father, husbands Robert Lowell and A.J. Liebling, friends like Allen Tate and Peter Taylor and Robert Giroux) than by her own not-large opus (three novels, a few books of stories—for which she won a belated Pulitzer more than a decade after the last was written). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 2003

"An engaging and provocative contribution to social history."
An unfailingly interesting study of a peculiarly American fixation: how to raise a child. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LAURA MCNEAL
by Poornima Apte

It was in 2002 when Laura McNeal was writing a magazine article about the evolution of home economics classes, that she walked up a stone staircase to a peculiar cottage called the Practice House in Fallbrook, California. “It had been built during the Depression because parents and teachers feared—incredibly—that high school girls weren’t learning the Home Arts,” McNeal recalls ...


Read the full post >

BLOG POST

2016 HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE FOR SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY & HORROR FANS (PART 1)
by John DeNardo

The holidays are approaching, which means it's time for family & friends, egg nog, and the annual panic of deciding what gifts to buy. But fear not! I'm here to offer up a tempting selection of gift ideas for the science fiction, fantasy, and horror fans on your gift list. 

For fans who are avid fiction readers ...


Read the full post >

BLOG POST

LAURA SHAPIRO
by Megan Labrise

Culinary historian Laura Shapiro hungers for the delectable details of people’s lives—no matter their competence in the kitchen.

“I have always felt very strongly that you don’t have to be a food person—that is to say, an instinctive wonderful cook—to have a relationship with food,” says Shapiro, author of What She Ate: Six Remarkable Women and the Food That ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

SEARCH AND SPOT by Laura Ljungkvist
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"With only the barest suggestion of a narrative—exploring implied settings from morning to night—and no compelling character to relate to, it is likely that this book will compel children who are not serious puzzle aficionados to search for something else. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Creator of the Follow the Line series, Ljungkvist here trains her digital tool kit on the seek-and-find format. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUTHIE AND THE (NOT SO) VERY BUSY DAY by Laura Rankin
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 20, 2014

"Readers of all ages will easily identify with Ruthie's trying day. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A child's big plans for a perfect Saturday are altered by a combination of unforeseeable occurrences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOLLOW THE LINE AROUND THE WORLD by Laura Ljungkvist
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2008

"Like its predecessors, this offers at once a challenging exercise for budding artists and a satisfying journey for armchair travelers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
In a natural follow-up to Follow the Line (2006) and Follow the Line Through the House (2007), Ljungkvist runs a new continuous black line from the front cover through each continent, back to New York City, into space for a gander at the universe, then onto the rear cover to spell out a cheery "Hej då" ("bye-bye" in Swedish). Read full book review >