Search Results: "Laura Regan"


BOOK REVIEW

LAURA by Larry Watson
Released: June 1, 2000

"A finely wrought, if emotionally cool, tale of enduring passion."
The story of a man's long obsession with a beautiful woman poet, the latest from award-winning novelist Watson (White Crosses, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURA by Hilary Norman
Released: Sept. 19, 1994

"Shallow escapism for the romance-starved. (First serial to Good Housekeeping; Literary Guild selection)"
A Cinderella story of a woman educated in the school of hard knocks, by pulp veteran Norman (Spellbound, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING LAURA by Kay Hooper
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Despite the adult sex and good surprise ending: a treacly adolescent affair, just a few steps beyond paper dolls and Barbie."
Hooper's latest paranormal romance (After Caroline, 1996, etc.) tackles reincarnation in a modern southern gothic mode, with lots of coupling in the gazebo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 29, 1996

"A list of museums and newsletters is appended. (Nonfiction. 8+)"
The subtitle tells it all; the first and later readers of the Little House books wrote letters that Wilder answered and saved, along with their drawings, photographs, and poems, right up to the last years of her life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURA BLUNDY by Julie Myerson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"The labors of love take on new meaning here, but despite the hypnotic quality of the prose, too many shadows fall across the heart of Laura Blundy, concealing more than they reveal."
Starting with a grisly murder scene, Myerson's fourth novel (after Me and the Fat Man, 1999, etc.) probes murky waters in Victorian London, as a woman crippled and in love trades in her surgeon husband for a married laborer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIG HOLE, SOFT MOLE by Carolyn Lesser
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Enchanting. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Lesser (Great Crystal Bear, p. 376, etc.) provides an appealing introduction to a little known animal: the star-nosed mole, who is not only an expert digger, but an excellent swimmer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF WATCH by Kay Winters
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A splendid complement to titles with a more fact-based approach to wolf life. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A brief, poetic picture-book celebration of the wolves in the wilderness and the birth and growth of four wolf pups. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WELCOME TO THE RIVER OF GRASS by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Writing in a form that falls somewhere between free verse and rhymed prose, Yolen continues her tour of world ecosystems (Welcome to the Green House, 1993, etc.) with a catalogue of flora and fauna in Florida's Everglades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIGER TRAIL by Kay Winters
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"This is an attractive nature read-aloud for the picture-book set. (Picture book. 6-8)"
The author and illustrator of Wolf Watch (1997) here team up again to let the tigress speak: "I am the tigress. / I walk alone. / No pack / no pride / no mate / helps me survive." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WELCOME TO THE GREEN HOUSE by Jane Yolen
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 21, 1993

"Unlike the plethora of contrived or sentimental books on the subject, this one is simplicity itself—eloquent and effective. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Taking as her text a sentence from Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle—"The land is one great wild, untidy luxuriant hothouse, made by nature for herself"—Yolen lyrically compares a house to the rain forest ("...no roof in the green house,/only the canopy of leaves") and notes its animals ("the quick-fingered capuchin/make their slow-quick ways/from room to room...a splash of golden toad,/a lunge of waking lizards,/a plunge of silver fish") and their sounds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURA WARHOLIC by Alexander Theroux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 15, 2007

"A bloated Bonfire of the Vanities for the pomo set, full of carefully placed products (Pringles, anyone?), in-jokes and elegant blather."
A big, drooly, shaggy dog of a postmodern epic, one that takes up an awful lot of space but doesn't give a lot of affection in return. Read full book review >