Search Results: "Laurence Pringle"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Readers will regard their refrigerators and freezers in a whole new, respectful light. (websites, list of films, source notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
A coolly fascinating, nostalgic glimpse into life as it was over a century ago. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 2000

"Written with clarity and resonance, this leaves the reader with a sense of progress as well as urgency for further change. (lists of ecosystem services, environmental and government agencies, further reading, index, not seen) (Nonfiction. 10-12)"
Laurence Pringle (Bats, 2000, etc.) has assembled a superior overview of the environmental movement from its inception to the present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET LIFE OF THE WOOLLY BEAR CATERPILLAR by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"Straightforward and informative. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
The author of more than 100 children's books looks closely at a familiar creature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROGS! by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2012

"Budding herpetologists will snap this one up faster than a frog can catch a fly. (author's note, answer key, list of resources for more information) (Nonfiction. 6-10)"
Science writer Pringle truly delivers with his latest, a fascinating look at the similarities and differences among the many and varied species of frogs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCTOPUSES! by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2015

"Pringle inks another winner in a long series of engaging, informative invitations to explore the natural world. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
A veteran science writer introduces the most intelligent invertebrate of all, the octopus, master of camouflage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A necessary title for most school and public libraries serving young readers, this will be welcomed for its calm tone and straightforward, comprehensive introduction to the subject. (index) (Nonfiction. 9-15)"
A clear, well-organized presentation of the evidence from earth's rocks and fossils, the variation of living things, the process of natural selection and the study of DNA and radiocarbon dating that supports the scientific theory of evolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCTOPUS HUG by Laurence Pringle
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 23, 1993

"A likable book that's sure to start kids romping, and maybe their parents, too. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When Mom goes to dinner with a friend and leaves them with Dad, the gaptoothed narrator and his little sister feel so out of sorts that they begin to squabble—but not for long. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACKAL WOMAN by Laurence Pringle
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Further reading (mostly journal articles by Moehlman); index. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
By the author of Bearman and Batman, another outstanding study of a contemporary scientist: the training, career, and daily activities of Patricia D. Moehlman, a behavioral ecologist who has spent two decades studying jackals on Tanzania's Serengeti Plain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BATMAN by Laurence Pringle
ANIMALS
Released: March 29, 1991

Merlin Tuttle, the ``Batman'' subject of this brief biography, dates his enthusiasm for biology to capturing a toad at the age of two. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"An excellent summary—so evenhanded that both sides in a debate could find it useful. Index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
In a clear and concise overview of major issues of their chemical and biological arms control, Pringle provides background on the dangers present, as well as of the social and political factors that have spread them even more widely than nuclear weapons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Visually striking, current, and informative, this is a must read. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
This super work on global warming by a noted science writer is an essential replacement for aging titles on the topic. Read full book review >