Search Results: "Lawrence David"


BOOK REVIEW

NEED by Lawrence David
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 16, 1994

"Some sharp-eyed producer will purchase movie rights to Need, hone it to essentials, inject a good deal more eroticism, and create a fine thriller; the book itself offers too few fireworks. (Author tour)"
A surfeit of detail and a slow-moving plot hobble this second novel by the author of Family Values (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEETLE BOY by Lawrence David
Released: Feb. 9, 1999

"Durand's illustrations express equally silliness and pathos, making Gregory as endearing as a beetle as he is as a boy. (Picture book. 6-10)"
When young Gregory Samson changes overnight into a giant beetle, it leaves him feeling anything but "snug as a bug in a rug." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"Illustrations not seen. (Fiction. 10-12)"
More goofy fare for Captain Underpants devotees about the masked Cupcaked Crusader—actually diminutive fifth-grader Horace, who gets temporary, unpredictable superpowers from special cupcakes, whipped up by his bigger, smarter, bossy little sister. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PICKLE AND PENGUIN by Lawrence David
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Fans of Peter Armour's unjustly neglected Stop That Pickle! (1993) will happily add this to the barrel. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Definitely setting new parameters for unlikely friendships, a strayed penguin and a lonely cucurbit go in search of each other after becoming separated on a busy New York City street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HORACE SPLATTLY by Lawrence David
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"Bad guys better stay away from Blootinville from now on—but you know they won't. (Fiction. 9-11)"
Watch out, Captain Underpants, there's a new superhero on the scene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD LITTLE GIRL by Lawrence David
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Lucretia will appeal to every child who has ever succumbed to vague parental procrastinations, and Oubrerie's illustrations are just what the story ordered: bug-eyed, elemental, and more than a tad crazy. (Picture book. 6-9)"
David's good little Miranda is being handed a bill of goods from her working parents: "Tomorrow," they reply to her requests, and they take her consent for granted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERHERO MAX by Lawrence David
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 10, 2002

"But it's his unwavering determination and quick thinking that's inspiring; with his father's gentle insistence, Max goes to school sans costume and ends up making friends the old-fashioned way—by just being himself. (Picture book. 5-8)"
What to do when you haven't found any friends at your new school and it's already (gasp!) Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY VALUES by Lawrence David
Released: July 5, 1993

"Caustic views—if somewhat clichÇd—of privileged Americans at home, but ultimately the banality of their existence finds only an echo where one might expect to find a plot."
Upscale family life in suburban America, seen through the eyes of each reluctant participant, provides the focus for a well- written but uninspired debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FULL MOON by Brian Wilcox
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2001

"Add this to the ever-growing pantheon of evocative picture books that take New York as their theme and as their heart. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A boy who lives in the countryside gets a glass globe of the city where his grandmother lives as a birthday gift. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LAWRENCE MILLMAN
by Gregory McNamee

In the winter of 1941, nine members of an Inuit community in a remote corner of the Hudson Bay died at the hands of three neighbors, one of whom proclaimed himself to be Jesus Christ returning at the end of days. The victims were presumed to be safe harbors for the devil, and one of the killers, a teenage girl ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID OWEN
by Alex Layman

The American West has long been a place of myth and wonder, of dramatic canyons, mesas, and mountain ranges. These dramatic landscapes have wooed Americans for centuries, and The New Yorker’s David Owen isn’t immune to its siren song. Though Owen has lived in Connecticut for most of his adult life, he spent the summers of his youth in ...


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BLOG POST

DAVID SAMUEL LEVINSON
by James McDonald

“I'm just furious,” David Samuel Levinson says, agitation lending his voice both energy and an edge. “I'm furious that we have to talk about this in 2017.” It was less than a month into the new administration when we discussed his novel, Tell Me How This Ends Well, and the dangerous implications for minority groups of ...


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