Search Results: "Lawrence Sanders"


BOOK REVIEW

THE 1ST DEADLY SIN by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Oct. 24, 1973

"Of its kind — commercial but classy commercial (far better written than say The Exorcist) — it's as addictive as anything you're likely to read for several uninterrupted evenings this season."
Full (October) selection of the B-O-M, a first printing of 100,000, an advertising kickoff of $50,000 — and you get the picture — the big picture (that too — Columbia) for a conglomerate novel which is half police procedural (remember The Anderson Tapes — here sans gadgetry), a quarter entailing some slinky, kinky sex (remember Sanders' Pleasures of Helen and Love Songs) and fill in the rest with a great detective, a detective's detective, Ed Delaney by name, and the additional grab (as if it needed it) that his wife Barbara is dying (is she?) of a strange illness called Proteus infection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TANGENT FACTOR by Lawrence Sanders
Released: April 17, 1978

"But macho-zombie Tangent and his gross confederate, Sam Leiberman, set the tone for a vulgar and sluggish tourist trap that manages to make deepest West Africa look and sound like a corner in New York's garment district."
Even the most undiscriminating patrons of Sanders' fiction factory will find this sequel to The Tangent Objective (in which mercenary oil-man Peter Tangent helped Napoleonic Obiri Anokye to depose King Prempeh of Asante) shamelessly conveyor-belted and totally resistible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSION OF MOLLY T. by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 17, 1984

"But, though limply idiotic as suspense and uncommonly vile as an attempt at misogynistic titillation, this is sure to sell fairly well—like Peter S.—thanks to the Sanders byline and the below-the-belt, lowest-common-denominator approach."
Sanders, never the most tasteful of potboiler-makers, continues his descent into sheer dumb vulgarity—following The Seduction of Peter S. with a neanderthal political/sexual thriller about the feminist threat of the future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THIRD DEADLY SIN by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Aug. 7, 1981

"Violent and vulgar enough for Deadly Sin fans, to be sure, with a few engaging moments in Sanders' lighter, sentimental vein; but Uhnak's slightly similar False Witness (below)—in which a psycho-killer is merely the trigger for the real drama—shows this up all too clearly for the exploitative, formula-ridden, second-rate hash it is."
This third outing for retired NYPD Chief of Detectives Edward X. Delaney has Sanders' customary low-level, sensationalistic readability—so it will sell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES OF THE WOLF by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Jan. 1, 1988

"Passable cave-man fun."
Best-seller Sanders digs up some of his pulpier roots in these 13 violent, sexist, hard-boiled crime tales (Mass Market, 1986) originally penned in the late 1960's but just now making their hard-cover debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVENTH COMMANDMENT by Lawrence Sanders
Released: April 15, 1991

"Ironic."
Sanders's name, like that of the aging Bela Lugosi, has lately become a virtual guarantee of incompetence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TOMORROW FILE by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 1, 1975

"It could be self-fulfilling."
Tomorrow's not far off in a plastiworld (everything, by the way, does seem to be plastiformed) of acronyms, computers, cassettes, clones, spare parts, genetic variants, government-licensed pregnancies and genders, synthetic foods and drugs, cosmetics to be applied to your most intimate recesses, and chromosomatic "efs" and "ems" (i.e., females, males)—a world in which you could easily lose your mind as well as your Personhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 13, 1983

"Crass stuff, then, neither funny nor involving, and more like a pornfilm scenario (without the hard-core porn) than a novel—but sure to attract an audience with the Sanders byline, the intriguing opening pages, and the heavily sexual premise."
The smirky, undramatic rise of a male prostitute—in a long, frankly plotless novel (171 teensy chapters) that offers Sanders' cheery vulgarity without any of his talent for mystery/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE SONGS by Lawrence Sanders
Released: May 30, 1972

"When Mr. Sanders decides there's more to life than nakedly meets the eye (or bravely assaults the ear — Use 'shit' instead of 'love' and the song sounds the same) perhaps he'll get back to a more interesting form of entertainment such as The Anderson Tapes."
You might almost prefer the randy Pleasures of Helen to the lyricized sensuality here (namely Maine) where Pieter Vanderhorst, a priapic forebear also called the Patroon, rules the household in a very virile fashion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECOND DEADLY SIN by Lawrence Sanders
Released: Sept. 2, 1977

"The end-product is unquestionably lively and as readably mindless as a padded Erie Stanley Gardner can be, but, if there are going to be five more of these time-wasters, one for every sin, a little more imagination and a lot less formula would be advisable."
Far less kinky and more straightforwardly police-procedural than the bestselling First, Chief Ed ("Iron Balls") Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIMOTHY FILES by Lawrence Sanders
Released: June 15, 1987

"Grossly synthetic and thoroughly unappealing: only for Sanders' most undiscriminating fans."
Three limp, unconnected episodes featuring Timothy Cone, "the Wall Street dick"—in an unusually sloppy, thoroughly hackneyed offering from an uneven, crass mass-producer (The Eighth Commandment, The Fourth Deadly Sin, The Passion of Molly T., etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

McNALLY'S DILEMMA by Lawrence Sanders
Released: July 5, 1999

"If Lardo doesn't win any new friends for the franchise, he won't disappoint old hands either."
You'd have to be a sharper-eyed sleuth than foppish Archy McNally to find Vincent Lardo's name in tiny print on the copyright page, but Lardo, not the late Sanders, is the author of Archy's eighth adventure (McNally's Trial, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >