Search Results: "Leo Hartas"


BOOK REVIEW

THE APARTMENT BOOK by Richard Platt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 30, 1995

"It's a unique and engaging entertainment, with no sign of Waldo anywhere. (Picture book. 7-11)"
Cross sections of a bustling, five-story apartment house at different times of the day appear in huge spreads that require readers to turn the book sideways; ``A Tour of the Old House'' and ``Who's Who in the Old House'' set up the real action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BANG by Leo Timmers
by Leo Timmers, illustrated by Leo Timmers
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"A cautionary tale on the hazards of distracted driving? If anything, just the opposite, but it's sure a lot of fun. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Silly results turn a multivehicle accident into a street party in this onomatopoeic import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CROW by Leo Timmers
by Leo Timmers, illustrated by Leo Timmers
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Timmer's 12 double-page spread illustrations, done in acrylic paints, are evocative and beautifully composed, with a wise use of white space— genuine works of art. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Everyone avoids pitch-black Crow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FISH TALE by Leo Yerxa
by Leo Yerxa, illustrated by Leo Yerxa
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1996

"Complicated descriptions of the narrator's state of mind nearly defeat the simple beauty of a single watercolor. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yerxa (Last Leaf First Snowflake to Fall, 1994) paints with expressive clarity, creating scenes children will love, but his words seem to be the work of a storyteller who is winking at adults in the back row. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EAT YOUR PEAS, IVY LOUISE! by Leo Landry
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 2, 2005

"EWSLUGp1989 and like ap-pea-ling fare and a perfectly timed complement to Little Pea (see below). (Picture book. 2-5)"
A toddler finds better things to do with an approaching spoonful of peas than merely chowing down. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAT BAT AND SWOOP by Leo Landry
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"A funny tale for newly fledged Easy Reader graduates, with more dialogue than description and illustrated with lots of small cartoon figures in ink-and-wash rural scenes. (Fiction. 7-9)"
A not-so-wise owl and his chubby buddy make both mischief and a new friend one night in this tale of "clothes" encounters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAST LEAF FIRST SNOWFLAKE TO FALL by Leo Yerxa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A soothing and lyrical work. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Winter is near at hand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN EXTRAORDINARY EGG by Leo Lionni
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"Just the thing to lighten up a picture-book hour. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Jessica is a fancier of stones and pebbles, but her friends Marilyn and August, also frogs, don't share her enthusiasm until she turns up with what Marilyn, "who knew everything about everything," identifies as a "chicken egg." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUS'S GARAGE by Leo Timmers
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2017

"Supersaturated hues and maximum automotive whimsy make this one to pore over. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Animal drivers in wacky vehicles visit the titular garage for special repairs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1998

An evocative, thoughtful, and otherwise impressive combination of memoir, oral history, and reflection on the nature of memory by a child of Viennese Jews who immigrated in 1939 to the exotic, landlocked South American country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOCQUEVILLE’S DISCOVERY OF AMERICA by Leo Damrosch
NON-FICTION
Released: April 20, 2010

"On this vicarious trip, Damrosch effectively demonstrates why Tocqueville proved 'a superb interpreter of American culture.'"
The journey and insights of Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 2003

"Even if you sometimes suspect that Braudy is stretching here and there to suit his thesis, his learned explorations are wonderfully engaging and provocative. A first-class work of cultural history, thoroughly impressive in scope and skill."
War changes a man, writes the distinguished cultural historian Braudy—and a woman, too, and all who fall between the dichotomous poles. Read full book review >