Search Results: "Leon Kabasele"


BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO PRAY by Leon Kabasele
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2012

"A brief, disjointed but passionate book about prayer."
Evangelical preacher Kabasele (Christian Philosophy: Understanding Racial Oppression, 2012) offers a brief overview of Christian prayer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 15, 2011

"Many readers will find the account of Kabasele's mysterious illness riveting, but little else in this awkwardly written evangelical tract is original."
Kabasele's traditional defense of Christianity blends biblical interpretation with an autobiographical account of a mysterious illness healed by faith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEASTLY THINGS by Donna Leon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 17, 2012

"Brunetti, who airily tells his wife Paola, 'I don't do ethical,' spends less time than usual (Drawing Conclusions, 2011, etc.) butting heads with his nemesis, Vice-Questore Giuseppe Patta. But his conspiratorial dealings with his omni-competent assistant Signora Elettra and his suave attempts at acting dumb while he's questioning his few suspects are equally rewarding."
The death of an inoffensive veterinarian takes Commissario Guido Brunetti once more into the heart of the human beast. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

O’HARA’S CHOICE by Leon Uris
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Bloody battles well done, much excellent period writing (aside from love-stuff), and altogether a recovery from 2002's woozy A God in Ruins. (For our review of 1953's Battle Cry ['It's terrific . . . Don't miss it'], go to www.kirkusreviews.com.)"
A posthumous novel by Uris, who died, at 78, on June 21, celebrates the Marine Corps, as did his first, Battle Cry, now marking its 50th anniversary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARISTOTLE AND THE ARC OF TRAGEDY by Leon Golden
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"A pithy examination of dramatic theory that shows glimpses of its whole landscape without getting bogged down in minutiae."
A book seeks to clarify Aristotle's theory of tragedy, drawing from some of the archetypal tragic heroes of Western civilization. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 4, 2013

"High-flying excitement that's missing an emotional edge."
In this World War I-era novel, a British soldier confronts how shameful it is to abandon the honor and glory of his country—and maybe his best friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Unforgettable. (Author tour)"
In this riveting account of how one child died at the hands of the health-care system that would save her, Bing brings to light a mechanism gone wild with greed and obscured by the silence of knowing collaborators. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXODUS by Leon Uris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 23, 1958

"For all of his lack of the basic literary skills Uris, writing from a hotly partisan viewpoint, has succeeded in welding his material into an effective and dramatic novel that should certainly reach the audience it is aimed at—and probably more besides."
Nothing less than the history of European Jewry from the end of the last century to the establishment of the state of Israel is the subject of this big novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOFU WITH CLOVES by Leon Billig
Released: Dec. 21, 2011

"An affecting, sometimes awkward novel presses the reader to root for its quirky, tragedy-stricken duo."
A complex father-daughter duo head back to their small hometown of Klosterberg, Texas, to get closure in this drama that considers the complexities of race in small-town America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEATH AT LA FENICE by Donna Leon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1992

"Deftly plotted and smoothly written in the Ngaio Marsh cultural mode, but recommended even for readers who, like Brett Lynch, don't care for Verdi."
Cyanide poisoning during the second-act intermission of La Traviata leaves the eminent conductor Helmut Wellauer dead, survived by a constellation of suspects from prima Flavia Petrelli (whose lesbian liaison with a wealthy American archeologist, Brett Lynch, Wellauer was threatening to expose) to director Franco Santore (furious over Wellauer's refusal to honor a bargain to find a job for Santore's protege)—and including of course Wellauer's suddenly wealthy, and much younger, widow Elizabeth. Read full book review >