Search Results: "Lesléa Newman"


BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 25, 2012

"Though somewhat heavyhanded, these poems are sure to instill much-needed empathy and awareness to gay issues in today's teens. (Poetry. 14 & up)"
Nearly 14 years after the unspeakable tragedy that put Laramie, Wyo., on the hate crimes map, lesbian literary icon Newman offers a 68-poem tribute to Matthew Shepard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEATHER HAS TWO MOMMIES by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 24, 2015

"Welcome back to Heather and her mommies. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Heather has two mommiesand a new look!Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS AVIVA by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2015

"This book could have used a little trimming, but it's clever enough to make kids curious about their own given names. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The mean kids at Aviva's school are cleverer than the mean kids in most neighborhoods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DADDY’S SONG by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2007

"Capturing a heartwarming moment as tuck-in time becomes a cozy, loving ritual. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Daddy strums his guitar as he sees his little girl off to sleep by singing her a unique song. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FIRE ENGINE FOR RUTHIE by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 23, 2004

"A good choice for challenging gender stereotypes and creating a culture of acceptance. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Newman's latest recalls the Charlotte Zolotow classic William's Doll. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPARKLE BOY by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2017

"Multiple titles already explore nearly identical themes, and at this point any of them will suffice until the industry yields more interesting and nuanced portrayals. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Newman adds to her lengthy resume of LGBT-themed books for children with this story about sibling rivalry and gender nonconformity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERE IS THE WORLD by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Both lovely and eminently useful. (Picture book/religion. 3-6)"
The year's range of Jewish holidays and celebrations are presented in this repeating, rhyming chant that features key succinct elements for each. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SWEET PASSOVER by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"Deliciously traditional. (recipe, author's note) (Picture book/religion. 5-7)"
A week of eating matzah has one little girl ready to swear off the bland, unleavened cracker for good, until a sweet, time-honored staple slowly changes her mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATS, CATS, CATS! by Lesléa Newman
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2001

"A whimsical tale perfect for cat fanciers young and old. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A celebration of all things feline, this frisky, rib-tickling picture book unveils the secret life of cats. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KETZEL, THE CAT WHO COMPOSED by Lesléa Newman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Truly, the cat's meow. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-8)"
A cat strolls down a piano keyboard and saunters into musical history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAILBAIT by Lesléa Newman
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 14, 2005

"Unfortunately, however, the characters are unremarkable and the 1970s setting adds nothing but outdated slang to the story. (Fiction. YA)"
Fifteen-going-on-sixteen, Andi is bored, lonely and cynical in 1970s suburbia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EATING OUR HEARTS OUT by Lesléa Newman
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 1993

"In the last of these qualities, at least, they can't touch the several well-known harrowing tales by slaves to alcohol and drugs."
Feminist writer Newman (Good Enough to Eat, 1986, etc.—not reviewed) put together this collection of original cries, complaints, and confessions on the belief that ``most of us [women] have, or at least at one time had, a voice inside us that nags at almost every meal: You shouldn't eat that.'' Lee Lynch, one of several lesbian contributors, maintains that ``there is probably not a lesbian in the world who would not, at the slightest sign of interest, tell you about her personal history with food.'' The ninety other anorexics, bulemics, overeaters, and other food- disordered women represented here—few if any of them accomplished writers—would seem to bear out these assertions with their lamentations about ups and downs and mostly losing battles against cake and chocolate and whatever high-fat confection might stuff up their empty and demanding selves. Read full book review >