Search Results: "Letitia Baldrige"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

"Vibrant and delightful, if a touch self-indulgent—but a humanizing look at the rich and famous of the past six decades above all."
A vivacious memoir by etiquette and style maven Baldrige that recounts, with humor and personal insight, her experiences in the diplomatic corps, the White House, and as a Tiffany senior executive, among others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 2, 1973

"Mary Chalmers' lovely spring lady, a pointillist vision in green and gold against a frozen wintery backdrop, is true to the tone of the story — but we expect more than shimmery loveliness from Hoban."
The rabbits in Birch Hollow have their own myth about the coming of spring and their own ritual for celebrating and facilitating its arrival. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ECHO LAKE by Letitia Trent
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 2014

"Beautiful language doesn't make up for the inconsistencies that permeate this first novel."
Trent, a poet, turns her pen to literary horror in this story centering on a community with a very dark soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MAN AND HIS HAT by Letitia Parr
by Letitia Parr, illustrated by Paul Terrett, photographed by Bob Peters
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 18, 1991

"Mildly amusing; the medium steals the show. (Picture book. 3-7)"
In doggerel with plenty of amusing rhymes and repetitions for beginning readers, the story of an old man who looks everywhere for his hat and finally finds it under his sleeping cat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COTTON SONG by Tom Bailey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2006

"Tiresome, by-the-numbers Southern fiction—an odd combination of the overheated and boring."
Trembling earnestness almost redeems the turgid prose and superabundance of stock characters in this murder mystery that strains hard for mythic import and Deep Meaning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 14, 1993

"Those seeking up-to-date guidance on the lessons to be learned from IBM should turn to Paul Carroll's estimable Big Blues (reviewed below)."
In light of last month's announcement that IBM was taking an $8.9-billion charge against second-quarter earnings and eliminating another 85,000 jobs, the incredibly upbeat subtitle of this parochial case study appears to have been overtaken by events—and is simply misleading. Read full book review >