Search Results: "Lewis J. Perelman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 16, 1992

"Educators themselves, however, had better have their blood pressure tested before they sit down with this book."
Education's in, school's out in this no-holds-barred, computer- instruction-driven harangue against American public education. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 1, 1999

"Natchev's paintings have the delicate and sumptuous qualities of religious icons, resembling the tapestries on which other grand stories have been told, but far funnier. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A thrilling story, at once preposterous and divinely ingenious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S NOT THE BABY by J. Patrick Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"I-spy reading fun for little eyes. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)"
A board book with great potential for interaction between a baby and the reader who shares it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUGG AND TEENY by J. Patrick Lewis
ANIMALS
Released: March 2, 2011

"Emergent readers will identify with Teeny as someone learning new skills, and her can-do attitude, emboldened by a supportive community, is a great model for attaining success. (Early reader. 6-8)"
Another odd couple makes its foray into beginning-reader territory with three stories about Teeny the monkey's efforts to realize her artistic potential while best friend Tugg the gorilla cheers her on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD’S GREATEST by J. Patrick Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2008

"Not all the spreads equal this level of cleverness, and it's overall a pretty slim premise, but it's not a bad way for kids to spend an afternoon—and it might send them to Guinness to think up their own. (Poetry. 6-10)"
This is not, as a quick glance at the title might suggest, an attempt to anthologize the best poems ever written, thank goodness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Lewis has done wonderful work in the past; this one doesn't measure up. (author's note) (Picture book/biography. 6-10)"
The best-described hero in Lewis's book is actually in the author's note, where he writes about his school janitor at St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"But traveling by poem is what I recommend.' (Poetry. 8-11)"
In catchy, clever verse, the prolific Lewis (Earth and You: A Closer View, not reviewed, etc.) plays with place names, marvels at the journeys of several explorers, goes "Island Hopping," gads about the cities of Europe, even provides mnemonics to distinguish stalagmites from stalactites, and latitude from longitude—"Lines of latitude / Have a f l a t i t u d e. / Longitudinal lines / Rise like porcupines." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"A stylish and artful work that will hold appeal for adults as well. (Picture book. 11+)"
Lewis offers an unconventional biography of the Mississippi blues legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"This is also an excellent choice for younger gifted children, who will enjoy the challenge of math problems with a humorous twist. (Nonfiction. 7-10)"
Math story problems aren't always boring exercises about dividing up a bowl of apples or trains traveling between cities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"Readers will sail just as lightly through this gallery of achievers, marveling as they go. (Picture book/poetry. 7-10)"
Lewis leaves behind the serious mood of his Freedom Like Sunlight: Praisesongs for Black Americans (2000) with jocose commemorations of 22 more important notables. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHOE TREE OF CHAGRIN by J. Patrick Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Fancy typeface and layout give the pages an over-designed look, but brawny, gray-haired Susannah towers as convincingly in Sheban's dusky scenes as in the grand music of Lewis's words, and fans of Anne Isaacs's Swamp Angel (1994) will welcome her into the fold. (Picture book/tall tale. 7-10)"
With contagious wonder and language as broad as the lady herself, Lewis (Good Mousekeeping, p. 743, etc.) adds an outsized new member to the ranks of tall-tale heroines, introducing itinerant cobbler Susannah DeClare: "Strong as a lockbox and as long as a good spit in a windstorm." Read full book review >