Search Results: "Linda Arms White"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 6, 2005

"A rollicking good story, the narrative is followed up by an author's note that explains the facts known about Morris and resources for further exploration. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A fictionalized biography of woman suffrage pioneer Esther Morris introduces her to readers at the age of six, as she studies her mother making tea and decides, "I can do that." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Let There Be Linda by Rich Leder
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An irreverent novel that gleefully spins the plot into preposterousness."
Estranged brothers have a chance to reconcile when pursued by a ruthless loan shark and faced with caring for their mother, just back from the dead, in Leder's (Juggler, Porn Star, Monkey Wrench, 2014, etc.) comic thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO ARE YOU, LINDA CONDRICK? by Patricia Carlon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"A vintage 1962 whodunit: clever, understated, and altogether expert, though its did-she-or-didn't-she dynamic lacks the edge marking the best of the eight mysteries by Carlon (Death by Demonstration, 2001, etc.) already to reach American shores."
For years, the Forst family, sheepherders in the Australian outback's remote Leumah Valley, have depended on the bounty of matriarchal Ella Forst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARING ARMS by Jo-Ann Power
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"Despite Beltway machinations, hi-tech wizardry and barely repressed sexuality, the result is a curiously bland thriller."
A Congresswoman and a mysterious agent team up to solve a murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OF ARMS AND ARTISTS by Paul Staiti
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A lively, splendid history that captures the times with insight, acumen, and a juggler's finesse."
How American art inspired a young country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 9, 2015

"An eye-opener and an excellent job of reporting and writing. The only drawback will be the dawning realization that as bad as the three stoners were, the government is sanctioning far worse in its zeal for secrecy and deniability."
Or, the gang that couldn't scam straight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A CALL TO ARMS by Alan Dean Foster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1991

"Dozens of alien species, none of them remotely convincing, numerous moronic discussions of the true nature of humanity—yet, with no plot or action or even much organization to intrude upon the alien maunderings, there's little danger that anyone will take this piece of nonsense seriously."
The damned what? one is tempted to ask of this curious, alien-infested interstellar war/first-contact/nature-of-humanity yarn from the author of Into the Out Of (1986) and To the Vanishing Point (1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRIENDS AND SCHOOL
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"No one has the temerity to claim that Brown was a cure-all for our nation's ills; perhaps this offering's greatest strength for young readers is the sense that Brown was part of a historical process—and so, now, are they. (Anthology. 10+)"
A nuanced collection thoughtfully commemorates, rather than celebrates, the 50th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN ARMS AND IDLENESS by Emmett E. Slake
Released: Sept. 21, 2012

"An unflinching picaresque of finding love and sanity in a place that was anything but The Land of the Morning Calm. "
Through the eyes of conflicted Americans and war-ravaged locals, Slake's compelling debut novel focuses on the "sordid side of garrison life" in post-WWII Japan and the absurdities in Korea that followed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDROID AT ARMS by Andre Norton
Released: Sept. 1, 1971

"Perhaps a sequel will tie up all the loose ends; here, Andros' willingness to settle for (and in) the parallel kingdom seems a disappointing cop-out."
As Andros of Inyana reels from planet to planet, this trisected story zooms from plot to plot, with each new start more remote from the initial center in interest. Read full book review >