Search Results: "Linda Asher"


BOOK REVIEW

ASHER by Mark Fyfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Less a novel than an attempt at a mordant, brief glimpse into a sociopath: a debut, filled with indulgences and bravado, that makes an impression despite its weaknesses."
English adolescent anomie, told from a male perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IGNORANCE by Milan Kundera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2002

"An honorable failure: Kundera's taking himself too seriously is offset by his ability to change the subject again and again—though, at end, nothing adds up to much."
Czech émigré Kundera (Identity, 1998, etc.) returns to Prague for this hodgepodge of romance, history, and philosophy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FESTIVAL OF INSIGNIFICANCE by Milan Kundera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 23, 2015

"This strangely amusing novella has the power to inspire serious efforts to find significance in the very book in which it is so perversely denied."
Forgotten tyrants and blatant belly buttons have equally playful roles in this deceptively slight, whimsically thoughtful tale of a few men in Paris not doing or saying much. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Let There Be Linda by Rich Leder
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An irreverent novel that gleefully spins the plot into preposterousness."
Estranged brothers have a chance to reconcile when pursued by a ruthless loan shark and faced with caring for their mother, just back from the dead, in Leder's (Juggler, Porn Star, Monkey Wrench, 2014, etc.) comic thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENCOUNTER by Milan Kundera
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Shows that bright shards of clear prose can serve as windows into the unknown."
A collection of essays, book, music and art reviews, ruminations and recollections by the celebrated Franco-Czech novelist (Ignorance, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURTAIN by Milan Kundera
Released: Feb. 7, 2007

"On bright display are Kundera's vast reading, his passion for his art and his disdain for the ordinary."
A celebrated Franco-Czech novelist considers the history of the novel and worries about its future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CASE OF DOCTOR SACHS by Martin Winckler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Our inherent fascination with medical stories aside, Winckler's patiently detailed exploration of a life lived almost solely for others makes his low-keyed tale as heartwarming and life-affirming an experience as it is an unpretentiously realistic one."
A piecemeal portrait of the days of a provincial French physician, this appealing 1997 novel (the second by its relatively late-blooming author, himself a retired doctor) won France's Prix du Livre Inter (just how many French literary prizes are there, by the way?) and was the basis for a highly popular recent film. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO ARE YOU, LINDA CONDRICK? by Patricia Carlon
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"A vintage 1962 whodunit: clever, understated, and altogether expert, though its did-she-or-didn't-she dynamic lacks the edge marking the best of the eight mysteries by Carlon (Death by Demonstration, 2001, etc.) already to reach American shores."
For years, the Forst family, sheepherders in the Australian outback's remote Leumah Valley, have depended on the bounty of matriarchal Ella Forst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: April 1, 1972

"But Potok, as in The Chosen, is able to sustain a singleminded gloomy intensity and will attract the same audience, assisted by the Literary Guild selection."
This features the agonizing young years of Asher Lev caught between the imperatives of his Hasid family's dynastic destiny and the forbidden visions of the goyische world of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIFT OF ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: May 11, 1990

"But, then again, there is that restless, eager journeying in the dark—and then the sudden shimmerings of possibility—in odysseys of the soul that gives Potok's spiritually searching novels their saving strength."
In this sequel to My Name is Asher Lev (1972), the author of The Chosen (1967) and Davita's Harp (1985)—as well as other fictional probes of the rich complexities of Jewish Orthodoxy—brings his protagonist artist back to the Hasidic community in Brooklyn from France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREEN AGE OF ASHER WITHEROW by M. Allen Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2004

"Disjointed material and unmatured style make for some rough sledding."
Life and death among Welsh immigrant coalminers in 19th-century California. Read full book review >