Search Results: "Lisa Dickey"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 29, 2013

"Fans of the Houston ladies will laugh, cry and beg for more. The rest of us will shrug and move on."
A talented, flawed artist, seen through the eyes of a loving, forgiving mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEARS IN THE STREETS by Lisa Dickey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"An affecting travelogue that reveals true Russian personality."
Adventures in Russia over three trips in 20 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERBIE HANCOCK by Herbie Hancock
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A warm, inspiring book by a man who seems to have little ego despite a career spent near the peak of his art. Recommended reading for jazz aficionados."
One of the most innovative and admired jazz musicians of his generation reminisces about his career. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 7, 2013

"Empowering, motivating and just a tad self-indulgent."
A former mayor of San Francisco introduces methodology to improve citizens' interaction with their government through the Internet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DELIVERANCE by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 23, 1970

"If so, a good deal more finesse, symbolic or otherwise, would surely seem necessary to sustain, or even make significant, such headlong events."
James Dickey's first novel is an ambitious tale of adventure in which character is tested, quite literally, if preposterously, through action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 21, 2015

"A great book explaining the workings of what Dickey calls an erratic, cobbled-together coalition of ferociously independent states. It should be in the library of any student of diplomacy, as well as Civil War buffs."
In this biography of Robert Bunch, the British consul in Charleston, South Carolina, at the beginning of the Civil War, Daily Beast foreign editor Dickey (Securing the City: Inside America's Best Counterterror Force—The NYPD, 2010, etc.) illustrates how an outside observer can understand more about a situation than the parties involved.Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LISA CAREY
by Megan Labrise

The Stolen Child may be set on a fairy-filled Irish island, but it is “Magical realism of the best kind, utterly devoid of whimsy,” according to Kirkus’ starred review.

“My friends loved that quote, ‘utterly devoid of whimsy,’ ” says author Lisa Carey, who was recently abroad in Turkey, where we reached her by phone. “They said that ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

TO THE WHITE SEA by James Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A ruthless adventure of body and soul by a writer of mature- -even awesome—powers."
Dickey doesn't write many novels—three in 23 years—but he makes every one count. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUCKY THE HUNTER by James Dickey
POETRY
Released: Oct. 11, 1978

"Milne carried it off but Tucky, failing to resonate, remains Grandpa's loving trifle."
Will adults really enjoy these forgettable verses inspired by Dickey's grandson? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INNOCENT BLOOD by Christopher Dickey
Released: June 1, 1997

"As a result, the sporadically suspenseful narrative lacks the menace it obviously was intended to have in recounting the metamorphosis of a likely all-American lad into an alienated avenger."
A first novel from Newsweek correspondent Dickey (Expats, 1990, etc.) that honorably attempts—and ultimately fails—to detail the making of a latter-day terrorist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRENGTH OF FIELDS by James Dickey
Released: Dec. 1, 1979

"This is a pleasant, sometimes inspired, new collection."
In a mode similar to that of his last book, Zodiac—the translation of a shipwrecked Dutchman's mad musing—many of these poems are Dickey's own sprawling, slightly mad narratives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 13, 1970

"Alas, lately he has shown a hunger to be king of the hill; foolishly reaching to the sky he can only embarrass his admirers."
It is hard to be a religious poet, even, or especially, in the pantheist, humanist, autobiographical twentieth century mode of James Dickey. Read full book review >