Search Results: "Lisa Hayden"


BOOK REVIEW

MASHA REGINA by Vadim Levental
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 10, 2016

"This genre-defying novel takes on the limits of talent and ambition, fate and art in contemporary Europe."
A young movie director takes inspiration from her life in St. Petersburg. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADDENDUM TO A PHOTO ALBUM by Vladislav Otroshenko
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 10, 2015

"A deeply strange novel that reads like a Chekhov play inspired by the comedy stylings of Monty Python."
A hallucinatory novella about an enormous Cossack family endlessly at odds with one other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 19, 1996

"As a guide for those desiring specifics rather than slogans, however, it is considerably less useful."
California state senator and former radical activist Hayden's (Reunion, 1988, etc.) prescription for our environmental malaise calls for a reinfusion of the spiritual to heal the divide between humans and the natural world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VOYAGE by Sterling Hayden
Released: Dec. 29, 1976

"Film actor Hayden, who broke into print with Wanderer, has written another elemental smash hit."
A voluminous, energetic epic approximating the voyage of the States through the year 1896. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LISA CAREY
by Megan Labrise

The Stolen Child may be set on a fairy-filled Irish island, but it is “Magical realism of the best kind, utterly devoid of whimsy,” according to Kirkus’ starred review.

“My friends loved that quote, ‘utterly devoid of whimsy,’ ” says author Lisa Carey, who was recently abroad in Turkey, where we reached her by phone. “They said that ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

WHY CASEY HAD TO DIE by L.C. Hayden
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 13, 2006

"Part cozy, part thriller, part scavenger hunt, Bronson's fourth doesn't quite do justice to any of its genres."
A retired Dallas police detective discovers that life on the road isn't all it's cracked up to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RELUCTANTLY by Hayden Carruth
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

Frank, curmudgeonly wisdom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIGER'S CHILD by Torey Hayden
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"An effective chronicle of a relationship full of potholes that nonetheless brings both student and teacher further along the road to maturity."
Sheila, the mute, abused six-year-old protagonist of Hayden's bestselling One Child (not reviewed), returns in a fast- paced, real-life narrative that rewards the reader with a happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAURUS by Eugene Vodolazkin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"With flavors of Umberto Eco and The Canterbury Tales, this affecting, idiosyncratic novel, although sometimes baggy, is an impressive achievement."
Love, faith, and a quest for atonement are the driving themes of an epic, prizewinning Russian novel that, while set in the medieval era, takes a contemporary look at the meaning of time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 15, 2003

"Pox is free of judgment, but the reader can't help but feel that safe sex never seemed a better idea. (Illustrations)"
The Great Pox, commonly known as the clap, is given a clinical but—how could it be otherwise?—morbidly fascinating historical profile by independent scholar Hayden, who proceeds to do some medical detective work in identifying famous people who may have carried the spirochete to their graves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 2001

"An electric piece of emotional archaeology and a welcoming back of an ethnic spirit—nonconformist, open, ancient—that anyone could be proud to claim."
A pugnacious autobiographical treatise, in which former California state senator Hayden reclaims his Irish identity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MATISSE by Hayden Herrera
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"This leads to a study thick with surface details (many of the paintings are closely described) but too shallow to encompass the inner currents. (Twenty-eight color, 80 b&w illustrations—not seen)"
Sympathetic bio-critical study of the French painter once savaged for his radical style. Read full book review >