Search Results: "Lisa Tuttle"


BOOK REVIEW

THE SILVER BOUGH by Lisa Tuttle
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 2, 2006

"Despite the layered folklore and hardworking backdrop, this suffers from tepid romancing and incoherent plotting."
Contemporary fantasy set in Scotland, from Tuttle (The Mysteries, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PILLOW FRIEND by Lisa Tuttle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Brilliantly murmurous, with extreme states of mental disorder presented as if they were as normal as blueberries on cottage cheese."
The first soft strokes of Tuttle's haunting fourth novel (Lost Futures, etc., not reviewed) build slowly, subtly into a relentless chiller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MYSTERIES by Lisa Tuttle
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 8, 2005

"Stylishly written, with evocative use of folklore elements."
Urban fantasy set in present-day England and Scotland. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINDHAVEN by Lisa Tuttle
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 24, 1981

"A pleasant, undemanding read, then, without subtlety or surprises."
A longish, predictable, charming but syrupy expansion of the linked stories The Storms of Windhaven (1975) and One-Wing (1980). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Kane Moss by C.D. Tuttle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 24, 2015

"A real treat for Western fans in need of a new fix."
Tuttle uses all the elements of classic Westerns and revenge stories in his debut novel about a Wyoming posse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAISLEY HANOVER ACTS OUT by Cameron Tuttle
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Flaws aside, however, Paisley is a feisty and compelling heroine to whom female readers will respond. (Fiction. YA)"
Paisley Hanover is on the fringe of Pleasant Hill High's popular crowd, aka the Pops. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Artful and absorbing."
In a felicitous synthesis of history, sociology, psychology, and anthropology, Tuttle (History and American Studies/Univ. of Kansas) represents in rich detail the intersection between public events and the way young children perceived them during WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAISLEY HANOVER KISSES AND TELLS by Cameron Tuttle
FICTION
Released: July 1, 2010

"Jam-packed with snarky observations and razor-sharp dialogue, this is teen chick lit with a brain. (Fiction. YA)"
Sassy Paisley Hanover is back in action to defend her unpopular peers (aka the Unpops) in this spunky sequel to Paisley Hanover Acts Out (2008). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET LIVES OF BATS by Merlin Tuttle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 20, 2015

"A page-turning memoir of curiosity about—and dedication to—a significant part of the natural world."
Bats are "sophisticated, beautiful, even cute, quite aside from their crucial roles as primary predators of insects, pollinators of flowers and dispersers of seeds," writes Tuttle, an ecologist who has championed their cause for more than 50 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NUMBER 6 FUMBLES by Rachel  Solar-Tuttle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Solar-Tuttle's fledgling effort has a beginning, middle, and end—but otherwise bears little resemblance to a real novel."
Youth-directed imprint's latest installment: a cringe-inducing first novel tracking a heavy-partying University of Pennsylvania sophomore who undergoes "buzz kill" with existential repercussions while watching Number 6 fumble the football during a Penn-Cornell game. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LISA CAREY
by Megan Labrise

The Stolen Child may be set on a fairy-filled Irish island, but it is “Magical realism of the best kind, utterly devoid of whimsy,” according to Kirkus’ starred review.

“My friends loved that quote, ‘utterly devoid of whimsy,’ ” says author Lisa Carey, who was recently abroad in Turkey, where we reached her by phone. “They said that ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

SWIMMING LESSONS by Lynne Hugo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1998

"More at home in the shallow than the deep end, though nicely detailed. (Literary Guild Featured Alternative)"
A schematic tale about the friendship between two women that, weighted by much pop psychoanalyzing, just barely keeps afloat. Read full book review >