Search Results: "Lloyd Alexander"


BOOK REVIEW

MY FIVE TIGERS by Lloyd Alexander
Released: Feb. 3, 1955

"Rabbit, the tiger alley cat, with his penchant for club and outdoors life; Heath-cliff, the Persian humbug, who brought up David the semi-Siamese; the many-toed Solomon and Moira, who upset the order of Rabbit's kingdom, are the central figures here."
An affectionate addict of the cat species devotedly follows their every step in a well written book on five cats of the wild domestic breed of diminutive tiger. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JEDERA ADVENTURE by Lloyd Alexander
Released: Jan. 1, 1989

"Fine, comic high adventure; beguiling jacket by Trina Schart Hyman."
Returning an overdue library book is sometimes an unpleasant experience, but seldom a life-or-death escapade—as of course it proves to be for superheroine Vesper Holly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 9, 1962

"The stories are amusing in spite of their treatment."
Dr. Camuti writes of his 40 years as a veterinary practitioner, recounting little stories, correcting popular misconceptions, and defending his favorite of all beasts- the cat- fang and claw. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 18, 1960

"A loose collection of reminiscences, which, though they alternate pleasingly between sadness and gaiety, lack the substance one hopes to find in a full length book."
Lloyd Alexander's love affair with music consists of a long, arduous, and largely unsuccessful courtship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JANINE IS FRENCH by Lloyd Alexander
Released: March 9, 1959

"Bright and poignant, this may appeal to the men as well as the ladies, for after all, Janine is French!"
A truly charming excursion into the wonderland of an encounter between an unsophisticated, unself-conscious and utterly feminine French woman and life in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KESTREL by Lloyd Alexander
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 1982

"This is old-fashioned story-telling through-and-through, its handling of themes more fossilized than timeless—which is probably fine with Alexander's audience."
Alexander's Westmark ended with printer's devil Theo helping oust the villains at court and his beggar girlfriend Mickle revealed as Princess Augusta. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ILLYRIAN ADVENTURE by Lloyd Alexander
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 1986

"A truly exciting story, it carries the reader along to a triumphant conclusion and the hope that Vesper may have another adventure before she settles down—perhaps in Illyria, where she seems to have left her heart."
Award-winning Alexander's stories have often taken inspiration from Welsh mythology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DRACKENBERG ADVENTURE by Lloyd Alexander
Released: April 1, 1988

"A happy addition to the Alexander oeuvre."
In her third adventure, Vesper Holly engages her adversaries, with her usual flamboyant Amazonian style, in a small Balkan country. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 22, 1973

"Vita brevis funibus."
Alexander's twist on the old bumpkin-on-the-town motif is to make his handsome and guileless hero a country cat, whose wizard master has consented to send him to Brightford in the form of a man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROPE TRICK by Lloyd Alexander
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"It is no illusion that this is a magical read. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's wonderful to be in the thrall of a master storyteller once more, as Alexander (The Gawgon and the Boy, 2001, etc.) spins this full-hearted tale of magic, illusion, and love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REMARKABLE JOURNEY OF PRINCE JEN by Lloyd Alexander
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

Recounting the adventures of the son of an imaginary Chinese emperor, a master storyteller once again weaves a compelling tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AND LET THE CREDIT GO by Lloyd Alexander
Released: Feb. 18, 1954

"Tabloidish."
This probably is meant to be fiscal funnery, but the little taste and less humor will not appeal to a discriminating audience — or to bankers. Read full book review >