Search Results: "Lorie Ann Grover"


BOOK REVIEW

HIT by Lorie Ann Grover
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"Forgettable. (Fiction. 14-16)"
A dual-narrator novel explores the concept of forgiveness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BIG HUG FOR LITTLE CUB by Lorie Ann Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"As realism is not the object here, these lions are cute, cuddly and toothless, safe for sharing a crib with baby. (Board book. 1-3)"
A day-in-the-life tale of a lion cub and his mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLD ME TIGHT by Lorie Ann Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2005

"Whether readers will hang on long enough to appreciate the positive ending is an open question. (Fiction. 9-12)"
An unrelenting string of bad experiences related in brief poems, this is another issue-oriented story by Grover. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON POINTE by Lorie Ann Grover
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2004

"Clare's loving relationship with her grandfather and her ability to cope successfully with the end of her ballerina dreams make her almost too good to be true, but she'll appeal to teens interested in dance. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Acceptance into the City Ballet Company in Washington State is the entire focus of 16-year-old Clare's life; in fact, she moves in with her grandfather over the summer to be near her ballet school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOSE THREADS by Lorie Ann Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"This compelling debut may offend some with its frankness, but many others will take it to heart for its many strengths. (author's note, Web sites, bibliography) (Fiction. 10-13)"
Seventh-grader Kay finds out more than she ever wanted to know about breast cancer in Grover's first effort, a fine entry in the emerging novel-in-verse subgenre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ACCIDENTAL ZUCCHINI by Max Grover
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Attractive, if not essential. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Grover's first is ``An Unexpected Alphabet,'' with pairings (``Fork fence''; ``Vegetable volcano'') that occasion amusing surreal paintings in crayon-bright colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX'S WACKY TAXI DAY by Max Grover
HUMOR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Grover's intense palette and artwork have instant appeal, but the vibrant colors are doing all the work and can't compensate for the stodgy text. (Picture book. 7+)"
Grover (Circles and Squares Everywhere!, 1996, etc.) mines wordplay with plenty of energy and color, but the sequence of events, concepts, and images are forced and clanky. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILT HOLLOW by Lorie Langdon
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A romantic thriller that fails on both counts. (Romantic thriller. 12-16)"
Eighteen-year-old Ashton Keller has spent the last four years of his life in juvie for a murder he did not commit. He returns home looking for justice or maybe just revenge but ends up finding something else completely unexpected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLES AND SQUARES EVERYWHERE! by Max Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"An eye-catching elementary introduction to the notion, also found in Dayle Ann Dodds's The Shape of Things (1994, not reviewed), that these basic shapes can be found everywhere. (Picture book. 3-5)"
There is no shortage of picture books featuring geometric shapes, but surely this is one of the brightest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMAZING AND INCREDIBLE COUNTING STORIES! by Max Grover
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A full-blast chuckle machine that doubles, very quietly, as a book about numbers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Subtitled ``A Number of Tall Tales,'' this book's loopy headlines—``Sleepless Residents Upset by 2 Giant Banjos'' and ``11 Telephones Found Growing in the Woods''—reach out to grab readers while explanations at the bottom of the page are written for maximum laughs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALI AND THE GOLDEN EAGLE by Wayne Grover
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"The author's attempts as a cultural tour guide are admirable, but the story works best as a far-flung adventure. (Fiction. 11+)"
An American who has lived in Saudi Arabia combines fact and fiction to honor the ancient art of falconry. Read full book review >