Search Results: "Louis Charbonneau-Lassay"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BESTIARY OF CHRIST by Louis Charbonneau-Lassay
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1991

"Accompanied by over 400 of the author's original woodcuts, this is a treasury of the wisdom of symbols, a hidden classic of spiritual literature revealed."
The first English-language edition of Charbonneau-Lassay's near-legendary meditations on the symbolic import of animals, real and imagined. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITE HARVEST by Louis Charbonneau
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 27, 1994

"A thoughtless retelling of stale material."
Charbonneau (Stalk, 1992) shows little imagination in this by- the-numbers thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS by Philip Callow
NON-FICTION
Released: April 6, 2001

"These stylistic tics, along with strained comparisons with the subjects of Callow's other biographies, suggest that the author is addressing no audience other than himself."
Another literary biography from an English novelist who has taken on Chekhov, Lawrence, and Whitman in the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL'S MENAGERIE by Louis Charbonneau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 20, 1996

"Mediocre thriller work—and, at times, flat-out awful."
A weary retread of Jim Thompson's The Killer Inside Me, by the author of, most recently, The Magnificent Siberian (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGNIFICENT SIBERIAN by Louis Charbonneau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 1995

"For all the exotic locales and creatures: really just another cat-and-mouse exercise."
Bloodless stereotypes, a blurred focus, and implausible coincidences blight the promise of this preachy eco-thriller from the author of White Harvest (1994), etc. Here, homicidal reactionaries use an imposing Siberian tiger and her three cute cubs in a plot to overthrow post-Communist Russia's democratically elected government. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STALK by Louis Charbonneau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 22, 1992

"Kapow."
A wafer-thin suspenser from Charbonneau (The Ice, 1991, etc.), this one resting on a peerlessly rickety premise: What if a man and woman, each on the run using an assumed identity provided by the government, happened to meet and set up house together? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE LOUIS by Randy Roberts
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 26, 2010

"All legendary athletes should hope for treatment by such capable, compassionate hands."
A sympathetic, moving life of the Brown Bomber by veteran cultural historian and biographer Roberts (History/Purdue Univ.; The Rock, the Curse, and the Hub: A Random History of Boston Sports, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS XIV by Anthony Levi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2004

"General readers may prefer to dip into the pages of Laclos or Hugo for a taste of the time. Levi's take is mainly for specialists."
A slow-moving, thorough life of the French monarch by a noted literary historian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOE LOUIS by Robert Lipsyte
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 30, 1994

"Challenging, readable; this is a deft portrait of a larger- than-life figure done in refreshingly human proportions. (Biography. 10-14)"
The sharp images and swift pacing of Lipsyte's (Michael Jordan: A Life Above the Rim, p. 1535, etc.) young-adult novels match his veteran sportswriter's knowledge in this biography of a boxer who became a symbol of African-American pride and, as Lipsyte shows, much more. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS XVI by John Hardman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 16, 1992

"Admirable for its primary political research—but lacking the warmth, color, and human dimensions of Carolly Erickson's To the Scaffold (1991), a Marie Antoinette biography offering a fuller, more balanced, and sympathetic picture of Louis and his court. (Twenty-four illustrations.)"
In a political, impersonal, and defensive biography, Hardman (a retired lecturer in modern history at the Univ. of Edinburgh) claims that Louis XVI, reputedly ``stupid, lazy, and impassive,'' was merely reticent, timid, ill-advised, lonely, and misunderstood- -and could have been called ``Louis the Silent.'' Born into a sprawling, extravagant, and unpopular monarchy, orphaned at age 11, Louis—private, shy, immature, and the least favored and least prepared heir to the throne—ascended to his kingship at age 19, when his grandfather died. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS HORST by Janet Mansfield Soares
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1992

"Readers may miss some of the passion that was a hallmark of this era and of Graham's life and associations (conveyed so well by Agnes de Mille in Martha, 1991), but, still, this is a worthwhile account of an important figure. (Thirty-two b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Louis Horst was a musician, conductor, and composer who, through his work with Martha Graham and other pioneers, profoundly affected the development of American modern dance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS UNDERCOVER by Fanny Britt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"An unflinching, delicate portrait of a boy and his broken family. (Graphic novel. 10-14)"
As his family falls apart, a young teen boy struggles to approach the girl he admires from afar. Read full book review >