Search Results: "Louis L. Buitendag"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BLOOMSWELL DIARIES by Louis L. Buitendag
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"Familiar tropes and a big but contrived surprise at the end—siblings off on a thrilling quest, unknown malevolent characters, the mysterious fate of the children's parents and a brief reference from out of nowhere to a murky scientific experiment lurking in the wings—will appeal to readers, particularly undemanding ones. (Steampunk. 9-12)"
Steampunk elements, a quest by a boy for his disappeared parents (who are actually British secret agents) and a desperate effort to rescue his older sister from sinister forces combine in this briskly paced adventure story set in an indeterminate past, most likely the early 20th century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS by Philip Callow
NON-FICTION
Released: April 6, 2001

"These stylistic tics, along with strained comparisons with the subjects of Callow's other biographies, suggest that the author is addressing no audience other than himself."
Another literary biography from an English novelist who has taken on Chekhov, Lawrence, and Whitman in the past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An election-year must-read."
Becker's novel, republished from 1995, imagines an alternate political reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS XIV by Ian Dunlop
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Rich in detail, plodding in pace. (24 pages b&w photos)"
A lavish but sluggish life of the Sun King (1638-1715) by architectural historian and biographer Dunlop (Marie-Antoinette, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS ARMSTRONG by Laurence Bergreen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 4, 1997

"The presence of Armstrong's unique voice turns what might have otherwise been a routine biography into a grand success. (16 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
This look at the life of one of this century's great personalities eschews meticulousness in its musical analysis in favor of a complete look at the man himself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS UNDERCOVER by Fanny Britt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 3, 2017

"An unflinching, delicate portrait of a boy and his broken family. (Graphic novel. 10-14)"
As his family falls apart, a young teen boy struggles to approach the girl he admires from afar. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS SOCKALEXIS by Bill Wise
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 2007

Capped by a climactic 1897 at-bat against the New York Giants' fireballer Amos Rusie, this short profile highlights the achievements of the first verifiable Native American to play in the Major Leagues. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS AUCHINCLOSS by Carol Gelderman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 13, 1993

"Not likely to win Auchincloss new readers, but this short biography will interest his loyal fans, if only to remind them of the scope and depth of his remarkable career. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Like her biographies of Mary McCarthy (1988) and Henry Ford (1980), Gelderman's latest is, at best, a competent sketch of a complex figure. Read full book review >