Search Results: "Louis Menand"


BOOK REVIEW

THE METAPHYSICAL CLUB by Louis Menand
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 23, 2001

"A singular achievement of intellectual history as well as a weighty entertainment. (21 b&w drawings and photos)"
Crossing the divide between academic analysis and insightful storytelling, this social and intellectual history explores the ideas of pragmatism by charting the lives of its founding fathers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN STUDIES by Louis Menand
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Brilliant thinking, though in a tone never given the reins."
From Pulitzer-winning scholar and New Yorker staff writer Menand (The Metaphysical Club, 2001), 15 essays: always intelligent, frequently interesting, sometimes tedious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUG IT OUT! by Louis Thomas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"It's not a complex story, but it's a wise one that shows through a specific example how siblings get along, even when they often don't. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The push and literal pull (usually hair) of sibling rivalry is explored in a direct and comically knowing way in animator Thomas' debut picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE LUCIE’S DIARY by Louis Pfanner
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2008

"Included in the end pages are instructions for readers on how to make their own mouse-sized felt hats. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This quiet homespun tale recounts a handful of days in the life of Little Lucie, a white mouse, as recorded in her diary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE by Louis Thomas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A pleasant if somewhat misleading invitation for armchair and lap-sitting travelers. (index) (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
To meet the animals who live there, a young boy travels to different habitats around the world, including his own backyard. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 14, 1990

Here, in one of his better essay collections (The Vanderbilt Era, 1989; Life, Law and Letters, 1979, etc.), Auchincloss describes friendship among 16 famous pairs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLOBODAN MILOSEVIC AND THE DESTRUCTION OF YUGOSLAVIA by Louis Sell
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2001

"An important contribution to the literature surrounding the disintegration of Yugoslavia and the ethnic wars that followed."
A welcome biography of the "Butcher of the Balkans," now awaiting trial before the International War Crimes Tribunal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THEODORE ROOSEVELT by Louis Auchincloss
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 4, 2001

"A master craftsman's rendering of a character who needs no embellishment."
Auchincloss (Her Infinite Variety, 2000, etc.) trains his acute sensibility and elegant prose on our most colorful chief executive, rendering Teddy as a man of his time as well as a timeless example of principled leadership. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 30, 1992

"Nizer's style can be melodramatic and his account self- serving, but, overall, he tells an engrossing and powerful story of a tragic miscarriage of justice. (Photographs—not seen.)"
In an effective though overwritten account, the distinguished trial attorney (My Life in Court, etc.) tells the tragic story of Murray Gold, a former client who, according to Nizer, was twice wrongfully convicted of a horrific double murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HER INFINITE VARIETY by Louis Auchincloss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 8, 2000

"Another fine chapter in Auchincloss's ongoing fictional chronicle of the American century."
One of Auchincloss's great themes—the decline of the ruling-class WASP—here expands to include the female strivers of the pre-feminist age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WARTIME LIES by Louis Begley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 8, 1991

"The settings and characters are vividly drawn, the story well-paced if familiar, but Maciek's guilt remains more an abstract concept than the haunting presence it should be."
Another novel about a Holocaust survivor's guilt—well-told except that the anguish, though regularly evoked, never really moves. Read full book review >