Search Results: "Louise Brierley"


BOOK REVIEW

CELEBRATION SONG by James Berry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Still, a lovely poem that offers a tropical backdrop instead of a white Christmas. (Poetry/Picture book. 3-8)"
Jamaican-born poet and novelist Berry's (The Future- Telling Lady, 1993, etc.) first picture book is an ode to baby Jesus on his first birthday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST AND OTHER STORIES by Adèle Geras
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"It's an elegant, but very cold, package, without a ready audience; the text is too long for young children, and the storybook format may put off older ones. (Folklore. 6-10)"
A retelling of eight familiar tales (along with the title story, ``Hansel and Gretel,'' ``The Tinderbox,'' ``Rapunzel,'' ``Vipers and Pearls,'' ``Bluebeard,'' ``The Girl Who Stepped on a Loaf,'' and ``Something More . . .'') in language that stays close to the original tone and timbre, with the complexities of nuance and situation intact. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUMOR
Released: May 19, 1992

"Unique. (Folklore. 8+)"
Incredible as it is, Native American riddles have never before been gathered together in a book; there's even been some scholarly doubt that native riddling traditions exist on this side of the Atlantic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN THE WORLD WAS YOUNG by Margaret Mayo
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An afterword identifies the sources of these treasures. (Folklore. 5-10)"
In a short foreword to this volume, subtitled ``Creation and Pourquoi Tales,'' Mayo (Magical Tales from Many Lands, 1993, etc.) offers readers a clear, simple explanation of the importance of such stories in every culture. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LOUISE ERDRICH
by J.W. Bonner

Louise Erdrich gave birth to a daughter (and opened a bookstore) at a momentous time in our country’s history—2001—and those twin poles of life and death inform her latest novel, Future Home of the Living God. As befits a novel by Erdrich, who has long considered the nature of time, Future Home of the Living God exists in two moments ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES DRAWING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Dog makes it easy to share his passions. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Crockett Johnson's Harold and Purple Crayon (1955) is a fruitful progenitor, and this descendent gleefully incorporates three distinct visual styles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES BOOKS by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: July 27, 2010

"This is the true, exact depth of purpose any avid reader, even the doggy ones, wishes—sharing the joy. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yates uses words and illustration sparingly to set the pace for this jaunty tale book lovers will lap right up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRIET THE SPY by Louise Fitzhugh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 1964

"Whether some adults will find this morally unregenerative, still it's a thoroughly realistic story with lost of very funny scenes and commentaries, and it features one of the hardest to handle, easiest to like heroines in a long time. Illustrations by the author not seen."
Harriet is an 11-year-old snub-nosed gamin with an elephant child curiosity and, let's face it, a noticing eye that runs to nastiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SQUIRREL ME TIMBERS by Louise Pigott
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"Arrr…frolicsome imagery cannot save this landlubber rodent from sinking beneath his book's awkward text. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A scrappy, scurvy squirrel finds his heart's desire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN ALMOST-GIRLFRIEND by Louise Rozett
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 25, 2013

"Depressingly familiar. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Rose Zarelli 2.0 is centered and in control, or at least that is the plan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL IN OL’ ROSIE by Louise Moeri
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Not as powerful as Moeri's earlier Save Queen of Sheba (1981) or as action-packed as Gary Paulsen's The Haymeadow (1992), nevertheless this will appeal to readers who've enjoyed both. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In the unforgiving terrain of eastern Oregon in the first decade of the 20th century, 12-year-old John Nolan (known to his family as "Wart") has been given a difficult, maybe even impossible job by his father. Read full book review >