Search Results: "Louise Brown"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 5, 2005

"Riveting and important. Even readers who don't think they're interested in Pakistani prostitution will find themselves engrossed."
British sociologist Brown documents the sex-trade in Lahore. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LOVE IS IN THE AIR - #RITAGH
by Bobbi Dumas

It’s an exciting week in the romance world! On Tuesday, RWA announced the finalists in the RITA and Golden Heart contests. (You can find the full list here.)

For those of you who may not know, the Golden Heart is Romance Writers of America’s contest for unpublished authors.

Some of my favorite authors and friends of Read-A-Romance made the RITA ...


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BLOG POST

MY CHILDREN'S BOOK GHOST FILE
by Julie Danielson

Over at NPR last week, I heard a pop culture critic talk (here) about what he calls his Ghost File, or the books, television shows, and movies he didn’t review during the year. “[I]t's the great frustration,” he said, “that every year I'm haunted by all the terrific things I haven't talked about … ...


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BLOG POST

IN FULL FLIGHT WITH GREG PIZZOLI
by Julie Danielson

The start of a new year is always exciting for readers. We envision brand-spankin’-new books from our favorite authors and new artwork from illustrators whose work we love to see. Look past our shoulders and you’ll see crossed fingers that our favorite writers and artists have something in store for us.

Most surprising of all is when we get ...


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BLOG POST

MAKING MISCHIEF
by Julie Danielson

One of my favorite pieces of writing in children’s literature, which began life as a lecture at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, is Patricia Lee Gauch’s “The Picture Book as an Act of Mischief,” which can be read here at the Horn Book’s site. Gauch starts out by paying loving tribute to children as mischief-makers—“Someone who ...


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BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES DRAWING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Dog makes it easy to share his passions. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Crockett Johnson's Harold and Purple Crayon (1955) is a fruitful progenitor, and this descendent gleefully incorporates three distinct visual styles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES BOOKS by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: July 27, 2010

"This is the true, exact depth of purpose any avid reader, even the doggy ones, wishes—sharing the joy. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yates uses words and illustration sparingly to set the pace for this jaunty tale book lovers will lap right up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRIET THE SPY by Louise Fitzhugh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 1964

"Whether some adults will find this morally unregenerative, still it's a thoroughly realistic story with lost of very funny scenes and commentaries, and it features one of the hardest to handle, easiest to like heroines in a long time. Illustrations by the author not seen."
Harriet is an 11-year-old snub-nosed gamin with an elephant child curiosity and, let's face it, a noticing eye that runs to nastiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SQUIRREL ME TIMBERS by Louise Pigott
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"Arrr…frolicsome imagery cannot save this landlubber rodent from sinking beneath his book's awkward text. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A scrappy, scurvy squirrel finds his heart's desire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN ALMOST-GIRLFRIEND by Louise Rozett
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 25, 2013

"Depressingly familiar. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Rose Zarelli 2.0 is centered and in control, or at least that is the plan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL IN OL’ ROSIE by Louise Moeri
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Not as powerful as Moeri's earlier Save Queen of Sheba (1981) or as action-packed as Gary Paulsen's The Haymeadow (1992), nevertheless this will appeal to readers who've enjoyed both. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In the unforgiving terrain of eastern Oregon in the first decade of the 20th century, 12-year-old John Nolan (known to his family as "Wart") has been given a difficult, maybe even impossible job by his father. Read full book review >