Search Results: "Louise Fatio"


BOOK REVIEW

A DOLL FOR MARIE by Louise Fatio
Released: Oct. 1, 1957

<p>Marie, a poor Parisian child, acquired an antique doll through the fortuitous quarrel of a dachshund and a fox terrier. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LOUISE ERDRICH
by J.W. Bonner

Louise Erdrich gave birth to a daughter (and opened a bookstore) at a momentous time in our country’s history—2001—and those twin poles of life and death inform her latest novel, Future Home of the Living God. As befits a novel by Erdrich, who has long considered the nature of time, Future Home of the Living God exists in two moments ...


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BOOK REVIEW

I AM FIVE by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But you couldn't accuse the pictured child of being greeting-card pretty—and her pesky energy does make itself felt."
In a sketchbook style, a scraggly, tangle-haired, kind of fat, and quite expressive little girl acts out a self-portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SECRET by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1965

"The scene is a small town on Long Island; the writing is not nearly as seriously funny as in the original; and even though Louise Fitzhugh is still well ahead of the field, the book is not as appealing as the first."
This is more about that spankingly (spankably?) fresh heroine Harriet The Spy whose initial appearance occasioned all kinds of discussion among those who monitor juvenile literature; some thought she wasn't very "nice"; some even took the position that she was "sick." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL SURPRISE by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"Small children who feel they aren't big enough to do anything will appreciate the message, while their adults might be inspired to look for the hidden talents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Small children may not be able to walk far, wipe their noses or tie their own shoes, but they have their own special talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOBODY'S FAMILY IS GOING TO CHANGE by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"All in all, this is more like a muted manifesto than anything else, but Fitzhugh's approach to family dynamics is certainly child centered, and Emma's observant sketches of her parents' and her peers' behavior, along with her own abrasive contributions to the agitation, provide some flashes of life and recognition."
If Paula Fox as a white author was criticized for writing of black experience in The Slave Dancer, even though her hero was white, Fitzhugh makes herself even more vulnerable by telling a black family's story from the viewpoints of the two children—Emma (short for Emancipation), about eleven, and Willie, seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPORT by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 30, 1979

"And—where the characters in the first book were memorable, larger-than-life caricatures—Sport's mother here is merely a predictable and uninteresting stereotype; Kate is too perfect an answer to the Rocques' prayers; and Sport's three friends—one Jewish, one black, and one Hispanic—seem an unrealistic vestige of naive Sixties didacticism."
You'll remember Harriet the Spy's friend Sport Rocque as the eleven-year-old who keeps house and account books for his impractical writer father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES DRAWING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Dog makes it easy to share his passions. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Crockett Johnson's Harold and Purple Crayon (1955) is a fruitful progenitor, and this descendent gleefully incorporates three distinct visual styles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES BOOKS by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: July 27, 2010

"This is the true, exact depth of purpose any avid reader, even the doggy ones, wishes—sharing the joy. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yates uses words and illustration sparingly to set the pace for this jaunty tale book lovers will lap right up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRIET THE SPY by Louise Fitzhugh
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 21, 1964

"Whether some adults will find this morally unregenerative, still it's a thoroughly realistic story with lost of very funny scenes and commentaries, and it features one of the hardest to handle, easiest to like heroines in a long time. Illustrations by the author not seen."
Harriet is an 11-year-old snub-nosed gamin with an elephant child curiosity and, let's face it, a noticing eye that runs to nastiness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SQUIRREL ME TIMBERS by Louise Pigott
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"Arrr…frolicsome imagery cannot save this landlubber rodent from sinking beneath his book's awkward text. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A scrappy, scurvy squirrel finds his heart's desire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PORCUPINE YEAR by Louise Erdrich
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Charming and enlightening. (Historical fiction. 9-11)"
This third entry in the Birchbark House series takes Omakayas and her family west from their home on the Island of the Golden-Breasted Woodpecker, away from land the U.S. government has claimed. Read full book review >