Search Results: "Louise Hawes"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LANGUAGE OF STARS by Louise Hawes
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 31, 2016

"A tale of self-discovery well suited for art-inclined readers who feel themselves on the fringe. (Fiction. 14-18)"
An act of vandalism revitalizes a small town. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSEY IN THE PRESENT TENSE by Louise Hawes
Released: March 1, 1999

"Hawes keeps Rosey's exact nature ambiguous without being coy; that, along with the distinct characters and a caring supporting cast, make this a thoughtful variation on the often-explored theme of coping with loss. (Fiction. 12-15)"
A teenager finds his way out from overwhelming grief in this poignant story from Hawes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VANISHING POINT by Louise Hawes
FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 2004

"Flawed but vivid. (Historical fiction. 12+)"
Lavinia Fontana, daughter of the painter Prospero Fontana, made lush Renaissance paintings that were sought after in 16th-century Italy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAITING FOR CHRISTOPHER by Louise Hawes
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 2001

"What this lacks in realism, it makes up for in character development and 'issue raising' and would be great for classroom discussion in a junior-high language arts class. (Fiction. 12-15)"
The author bases this latest on a premise so unlikely it is almost laughable, yet the characters involved are worth caring about. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUISE by Louise Krug
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2012

"There are fine moments here, but also considerable padding, so that, like so many other books, this is really a magazine article—interesting and readable, but an article all the same."
Memoir of a life turned upside down by illness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK PEARLS by Louise Hawes
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 19, 2008

"A cover blurb from Holly Black coupled with Rebecca Guay's curvaceous pencil drawings will draw fans to this worthwhile collection of sensuous fantasy. (Fantasy/short stories. YA)"
Seven classic fairy tales receive mature, magical and sometimes erotic happily-never-after retellings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUTI’S NECKLACE by Louise Hawes
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 26, 2006

"Evocative pretend-papyrus papers and glowing, detailed watercolor-and-gouache pictures of the comely Pharaoh, his serving girls in richly adorned, diaphanous dresses and Egyptian icons galore give a fairy-tale feel to this immoderately romantic telling. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Inspired by an ancient tale (probably "The Story of the Green Jewel," although the author does not name it), and subtitled "The Oldest Story in the World" (which other sources identify as Gilgamesh), this is the story of Muti, "daughter of Egypt," who from birth has worn the precious turquoise-and-carnelian necklace crafted by her loving father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY LOUISE by David Collins
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 15, 2002

"Artistically rather bumpy, but Collins's earnestness will touch most readers all the same."
Collins's debut memoir chronicles his wife's losing battle with breast cancer and his subsequent struggle to raise their two-year-old daughter alone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLEASE, LOUISE by Toni Morrison
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 4, 2014

"An ode to reading that raises too many concerns. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A young girl sets out on a solitary walk to a surprise destination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUISE THE BIG CHEESE by Elise Primavera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2009

"Charming from endpapers to endpapers. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Even second bananas sometimes have their day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NECKING WITH LOUISE by Rick Book
Released: Aug. 31, 1999

"Readers will come to know—and like—Eric and admire the way he rises to every occasion. (Short stories. 12-14)"
Work, sports, making out, and breaking up: in seven linked stories set in 1965 a Saskatchewan teenager spins vividly personal takes on universal themes of adolescence, adding no fewer than three brushes with death to make the pleasures and pains of life all the more intense. Read full book review >