Search Results: "Louise Lawrence"


BOOK REVIEW

DREAM-WEAVER by Louise Lawrence
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 18, 1996

"The hasty and unexpected ending is a disappointment in an otherwise promising interstellar adventure. (Fiction. 9+)"
Lawrence (Keeper of the Universe, 1993, etc.) presents the story of wealthy space colonists fleeing an ecologically damaged Earth in droves for a chance to live on a virgin planet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEPER OF THE UNIVERSE by Louise Lawrence
FANTASY
Released: April 20, 1993

"Thin ideas, thick prose. (Fiction. 12+)"
Galactic Overseer Ben-Harran brings together restless earthling Christopher and warrior queen Mahri from worlds in his galaxy; and, from a realm controlled by his enemies, Kysha, who is at first appalled by the vicious Mahri but is soon convinced that freedom is better than the passive obedience she's always known. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANDRA by Louise Lawrence
FICTION
Released: April 15, 1991

"Entertaining, but seriously flawed. (Fiction. 11+)"
Two thousand years in the future, a misfit yearns for a long-lost planet. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LAWRENCE MILLMAN
by Gregory McNamee

In the winter of 1941, nine members of an Inuit community in a remote corner of the Hudson Bay died at the hands of three neighbors, one of whom proclaimed himself to be Jesus Christ returning at the end of days. The victims were presumed to be safe harbors for the devil, and one of the killers, a teenage girl ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES COUNTING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A worthy addition to the ranks of animal-themed counting books. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Yates' lovable Dog—of Dog Loves Books (2010) and Dog Loves Drawing (2012)—is back for some counting fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL SURPRISE by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"Small children who feel they aren't big enough to do anything will appreciate the message, while their adults might be inspired to look for the hidden talents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Small children may not be able to walk far, wipe their noses or tie their own shoes, but they have their own special talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPORT by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 30, 1979

"And—where the characters in the first book were memorable, larger-than-life caricatures—Sport's mother here is merely a predictable and uninteresting stereotype; Kate is too perfect an answer to the Rocques' prayers; and Sport's three friends—one Jewish, one black, and one Hispanic—seem an unrealistic vestige of naive Sixties didacticism."
You'll remember Harriet the Spy's friend Sport Rocque as the eleven-year-old who keeps house and account books for his impractical writer father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOBODY'S FAMILY IS GOING TO CHANGE by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"All in all, this is more like a muted manifesto than anything else, but Fitzhugh's approach to family dynamics is certainly child centered, and Emma's observant sketches of her parents' and her peers' behavior, along with her own abrasive contributions to the agitation, provide some flashes of life and recognition."
If Paula Fox as a white author was criticized for writing of black experience in The Slave Dancer, even though her hero was white, Fitzhugh makes herself even more vulnerable by telling a black family's story from the viewpoints of the two children—Emma (short for Emancipation), about eleven, and Willie, seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM FIVE by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But you couldn't accuse the pictured child of being greeting-card pretty—and her pesky energy does make itself felt."
In a sketchbook style, a scraggly, tangle-haired, kind of fat, and quite expressive little girl acts out a self-portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SECRET by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1965

"The scene is a small town on Long Island; the writing is not nearly as seriously funny as in the original; and even though Louise Fitzhugh is still well ahead of the field, the book is not as appealing as the first."
This is more about that spankingly (spankably?) fresh heroine Harriet The Spy whose initial appearance occasioned all kinds of discussion among those who monitor juvenile literature; some thought she wasn't very "nice"; some even took the position that she was "sick." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES DRAWING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 14, 2012

"Dog makes it easy to share his passions. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Crockett Johnson's Harold and Purple Crayon (1955) is a fruitful progenitor, and this descendent gleefully incorporates three distinct visual styles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES BOOKS by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: July 27, 2010

"This is the true, exact depth of purpose any avid reader, even the doggy ones, wishes—sharing the joy. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Yates uses words and illustration sparingly to set the pace for this jaunty tale book lovers will lap right up. Read full book review >