Search Results: "Louise Rozett"


BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN ANGRY GIRL by Louise Rozett
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Like reading bad television. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Fifteen-year-old Rose Zarelli has every right to be angry, but she needs to figure out a way to control it, or she risks losing everything she loves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN ALMOST-GIRLFRIEND by Louise Rozett
YOUNG ADULT
Released: June 25, 2013

"Depressingly familiar. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Rose Zarelli 2.0 is centered and in control, or at least that is the plan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES COUNTING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A worthy addition to the ranks of animal-themed counting books. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Yates' lovable Dog—of Dog Loves Books (2010) and Dog Loves Drawing (2012)—is back for some counting fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SECRET by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1965

"The scene is a small town on Long Island; the writing is not nearly as seriously funny as in the original; and even though Louise Fitzhugh is still well ahead of the field, the book is not as appealing as the first."
This is more about that spankingly (spankably?) fresh heroine Harriet The Spy whose initial appearance occasioned all kinds of discussion among those who monitor juvenile literature; some thought she wasn't very "nice"; some even took the position that she was "sick." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM FIVE by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But you couldn't accuse the pictured child of being greeting-card pretty—and her pesky energy does make itself felt."
In a sketchbook style, a scraggly, tangle-haired, kind of fat, and quite expressive little girl acts out a self-portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL SURPRISE by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"Small children who feel they aren't big enough to do anything will appreciate the message, while their adults might be inspired to look for the hidden talents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Small children may not be able to walk far, wipe their noses or tie their own shoes, but they have their own special talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOBODY'S FAMILY IS GOING TO CHANGE by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"All in all, this is more like a muted manifesto than anything else, but Fitzhugh's approach to family dynamics is certainly child centered, and Emma's observant sketches of her parents' and her peers' behavior, along with her own abrasive contributions to the agitation, provide some flashes of life and recognition."
If Paula Fox as a white author was criticized for writing of black experience in The Slave Dancer, even though her hero was white, Fitzhugh makes herself even more vulnerable by telling a black family's story from the viewpoints of the two children—Emma (short for Emancipation), about eleven, and Willie, seven. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPORT by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 30, 1979

"And—where the characters in the first book were memorable, larger-than-life caricatures—Sport's mother here is merely a predictable and uninteresting stereotype; Kate is too perfect an answer to the Rocques' prayers; and Sport's three friends—one Jewish, one black, and one Hispanic—seem an unrealistic vestige of naive Sixties didacticism."
You'll remember Harriet the Spy's friend Sport Rocque as the eleven-year-old who keeps house and account books for his impractical writer father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLDEN & GREY by Louise Arnold
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 7, 2008

"Lightly frightful, frothy fun. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
Tom Golden's latest adventure among the unseen involves a trio of escaped ancient ghosts and the dread prospect of ghost sightings by ordinary humans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING DADDY by Louise Plummer
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Nov. 13, 2007

"Her timing is perfect in this fast-paced, heart-pounding suspense story. (Fiction. 12-14)"
There is only one thing missing from 15-year-old Mira Kent's almost perfect life: her Daddy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"It's up to Grey and Tom's other spectral chums to effect an ectoplasmic rescue in a fast-paced, perfectly plausible read that will have readers wishing they, too, had such remarkable friends, ghostly or otherwise. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Tom Golden and Grey Arthur are misfits. Read full book review >