Search Results: "Louise Steinman"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CROOKED MIRROR by Louise Steinman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"Steinman's elegiac book is a powerful reminder of how ideologies can become 'crooked mirror[s]' that distort reality and destroy lives, cultures and nations."
A writer/literary curator explores the anguished, often contentious topic of Polish Jewry through the lens of her own family history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 2001

"An affecting memoir and a convincing plea for pacifism: Steinman's hypnotizing prose exposes the senselessness of war by showing how conflicting governments have destroyed families by ripping common people out of their homes and forcing them to kill each other."
Steinman travels back in time and across the globe to capture the horrors of WWII as experienced by her father and a Japanese soldier, whom he may have killed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 1996

"Most readers will pick up this volume for its literary interest, but the human content is what makes it memorable."
Charming correspondence between the Irish short-story writer and his editor at the New Yorker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE DEADLY THINGS by Harry Steinman
Released: Sept. 12, 2012

"A terrific sci-fi thriller that grips the reader from beginning to end."
Cutting-edge technology combines with the dark side of the human soul to create the potential for terrifying destruction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELEPHANT HUNT MASSACRE by Jon Steinman
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 2, 2014

"A fun, satirical mystery that proves just how ridiculous partisan politics can be."
Former political reporter Steinman offers a witty debut political thriller heavily laced with satire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOMEN IN VIETNAM by Ron Steinman
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Without sanctifying the women in Vietnam, these interviews open an important window to the difference between how men and women view war. (b&w photos, not seen)"
Women who served in the Vietnam War offer a moving set of reflections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 25, 2001

"Studded with insights and with prose as elegant as that in either writer's fiction, these letters delineate an epistolary friendship that makes 84 Charing Cross Road look dull."
The correspondence of New Yorker editor William Maxwell and poet, short-story writer, and novelist Sylvia Townsend Warner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOG LOVES COUNTING by Louise Yates
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"A worthy addition to the ranks of animal-themed counting books. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Yates' lovable Dog—of Dog Loves Books (2010) and Dog Loves Drawing (2012)—is back for some counting fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM FIVE by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But you couldn't accuse the pictured child of being greeting-card pretty—and her pesky energy does make itself felt."
In a sketchbook style, a scraggly, tangle-haired, kind of fat, and quite expressive little girl acts out a self-portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SECRET by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1965

"The scene is a small town on Long Island; the writing is not nearly as seriously funny as in the original; and even though Louise Fitzhugh is still well ahead of the field, the book is not as appealing as the first."
This is more about that spankingly (spankably?) fresh heroine Harriet The Spy whose initial appearance occasioned all kinds of discussion among those who monitor juvenile literature; some thought she wasn't very "nice"; some even took the position that she was "sick." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL SURPRISE by Louise Yates
ANIMALS
Released: May 12, 2009

"Small children who feel they aren't big enough to do anything will appreciate the message, while their adults might be inspired to look for the hidden talents. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Small children may not be able to walk far, wipe their noses or tie their own shoes, but they have their own special talents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPORT by Louise Fitzhugh
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 30, 1979

"And—where the characters in the first book were memorable, larger-than-life caricatures—Sport's mother here is merely a predictable and uninteresting stereotype; Kate is too perfect an answer to the Rocques' prayers; and Sport's three friends—one Jewish, one black, and one Hispanic—seem an unrealistic vestige of naive Sixties didacticism."
You'll remember Harriet the Spy's friend Sport Rocque as the eleven-year-old who keeps house and account books for his impractical writer father. Read full book review >