Search Results: "Louise Ure"


BOOK REVIEW

FORCING AMARYLLIS by Louise Ure
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 20, 2005

"A warm first-person narrative and a confident tone but not much of a mystery. Fascinating passages about jury selection set Ure's debut apart."
A trial consultant risks life and career to pursue the man who assaulted her sister and left her for dead. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FAULT TREE by Louise Ure
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"Ure (Forcing Amaryllis, 2005) may not provide an especially original plot, but Cade is the best blind detective since the glory days of Max Carrados a century ago."
A blind auto mechanic becomes first the improbable witness to the escape of a pair of killers and then, even more improbably, a sleuth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIARS ANONYMOUS by Louise Ure
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 14, 2009

"Ure (The Fault Tree, 2008, etc.) provides a meaty, twisty puzzle. But the real prize here is Jessie, a tough, conflicted heroine you won't soon forget."
An emergency operator who's already gotten away with one murder gets involved in another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKINNY MELON AND ME by Jean Ure
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Readers may feel underestimated when Cherry recopies and translates all of them near the end, but this self-assured young narrator keeps things hopping, and her ultimate change of heart is well earned. (Fiction. 10-12)"
A brash 11-year-old chronicles family changes in this brightly chatty import from the author of The Children Next Door (1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHILDREN NEXT DOOR by Jean Ure
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"Readers may find themselves without patience for such meandering; the jacket art gives away the ghostly element even as it clashes with character descriptions from the text. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Laura is so timid that when she hears a girl, Em, and her little brother, Tommy, playing next door she listens and watches them furtively without introducing herself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAWKS AND ROSES by Jim Ure
NON-FICTION
Released: May 13, 1991

"Funny, warm, sad, and informativejust the sort of rich memoir that animal-lovers enjoy."
With deftness, wit, and charm, Ure, a former journalist and Disney animal trainer, writes of the Utah predatory bird rehabilitation project begun in 1973 by him and his wife, Stel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLAGUE by Jean Ure
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"The loose ends make the story all the more chilling. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Fran returns from a month at camp to find her family, and nearly everyone else in London, dead of a mysterious disease. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Laughing Trout by Jim Ure
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 17, 2013

"Fishermen will love this book for its attention to detail and for seeing the humor in their obsessions, but a more general audience may not quite get it.
"
Fly-fishing enthusiasts turn a lazy fishing town into a madhouse as they try to become the first to snag an ugly trout for a big reward in this playful, good-natured insider's sendup of the sport. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WIZARD IN THE WOODS by Jean Ure
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Still, readers who appreciate the loopholes that make magic so difficult may find that humor carries the day, helped by Anstey's comic b&w spot illustrations. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Ben-Muzzy, inept apprentice wizard, is hopelessly tangled up by the spell-making words that the Grand High Wizard forces into his head. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I AM FIVE by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But you couldn't accuse the pictured child of being greeting-card pretty—and her pesky energy does make itself felt."
In a sketchbook style, a scraggly, tangle-haired, kind of fat, and quite expressive little girl acts out a self-portrait. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG SECRET by Louise Fitzhugh
FICTION
Released: Oct. 27, 1965

"The scene is a small town on Long Island; the writing is not nearly as seriously funny as in the original; and even though Louise Fitzhugh is still well ahead of the field, the book is not as appealing as the first."
This is more about that spankingly (spankably?) fresh heroine Harriet The Spy whose initial appearance occasioned all kinds of discussion among those who monitor juvenile literature; some thought she wasn't very "nice"; some even took the position that she was "sick." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BY THE GRACE OF TODD by Louise Galveston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2014

"The 'to be continued' on the final page reads like a threat. (Fantasy. 8-11)"
Can a kid who killed his hermit crab through neglect save a brand new civilization? Read full book review >