Search Results: "Lucretia Grindle"


BOOK REVIEW

VILLA TRISTE by Lucretia Grindle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 22, 2013

"Grindle's book is a good modern-day mystery, a very good historical narrative and an excellent combination of the two."
Grindle (The Lost Daughter, 2012, etc.) combines a contemporary mystery with historical fiction in her captivating narrative about Italian partisans in World War II and a modern-day police inspector determined to uncover certain truths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHTSPINNERS by Lucretia Grindle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 18, 2003

"A well-fashioned if unsurprising tale of psychological terror."
British author Grindle debuts in hardcover with this slow-to-ignite, if serviceably suspenseful, tale about twin sisters who grow up in rural Georgia sharing a telepathic kinship and the same besotted serial killer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW WE WON AND LOST THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN by Douglas  Grindle
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2017

"Maddening, but helpful in pointing the way toward meaningful reforms in the conduct of American policy in the region."
The U.S. has spent more than $1 trillion on the war in Afghanistan, with more to come. Journalist and military analyst Grindle shows why that loss of treasure has amounted to so little. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PETERKINS’ CHRISTMAS by Lucretia Hale
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 4, 2010

"The quietly humorous story focuses on the daughter of the family, Elizabeth Eliza, and includes excerpts from her letters to the Lady from Philadelphia (who is always mysteriously there with the obvious answer), set off in italics to distinguish them from the third-person text. (Picture book. 6-9)"
This adapted excerpt from the 19th-century classic The Peterkin Papers focuses on the foolish family's preparations for Christmas, with the specific problems of a Christmas tree that's too tall for the parlor, a lack of proper decorations for such a huge tree, and a piano that can be played only through an open window. Read full book review >