Search Results: "Lucy S. Dawidowicz"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 8, 1989

The story of Dawidowicz's early years and a tribute to the Jewish community and culture of Vilna (then in Poland, now in Soviet Lithuania). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUCY by Ellen Feldman
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Highly romanticized, oddly apolitical, and not very compelling."
Historical about the love affair between FDR and Lucy Mercer, from Lucy's point of view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUCY by Laurence Gonzales
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2010

"Michael Crichton might have produced this had he had a literary sensibility. Thoroughly well-written, grounded in science and a sorrowful sense of human nature, this book is utterly memorable."
Masterful storyteller Gonzales (Everyday Survival, 2008, etc.) returns to fiction with a pensive meditation on a question of biology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUCY by Randy Cecil
Kirkus Star
by Randy Cecil, illustrated by Randy Cecil
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A brief denouement in the final act reveals that each main character has given the others just what they needed; a clever structure and a satisfying story. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Defying simple categorization, Cecil's 144-page illustrated narrative presents a street dog that dreams of home, a light-skinned girl who longs for companionship, and her father, a juggler who panics in front of an audience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LENNY & LUCY by Philip C. Stead
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Hypnotic artwork and storytelling invite children to linger in the wild woods of worry and emerge intact, enriched, and utterly invigorated by this complex, contemporary fairy tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Peter, his dad, and his dog, Harold, move to a narrow house just on the other side of "dark unfriendly woods," across a rickety bridge. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LUCY RESCUED by Harriet Ziefert
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2012

"A sweet take on the bumps in the road home for one shelter dog. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Lucy may have been rescued from the animal shelter, but this pup takes time to adjust to her new, loving family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. S by George Jacobs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2003

"Deliciously gossipy, yet Sinatra is recalled with affection rather than spite."
As-told-to memoir of life with the famous crooner by his African-American Man Friday, lubricated with racy tales about the stars, the Kennedys, and the Mob. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >