Search Results: "Ludwig Bemelmans"


BOOK REVIEW

THE WORLD OF BEMELMANS by Ludwig Bemelmans
Released: Oct. 7, 1955

"It should make new converts."
There is definitely a Bemelmans' cult, and some of his earlier work- now out of print- has helped build that enthusiastic corps of admirers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANSI by Ludwig Bemelmans
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1934

"One of the nicest books of the year."
An enchanting picture story book about a small boy who goes from Innsbruch up to the high mountains of the Tyrol for his Christmas holidays, and of his adventures there with his uncle and aunt and small cousin and the dachshund who went for a ski ride. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MADELINE'S RESCUE by Ludwig Bemelmans
FICTION
Released: April 3, 1953

"A Gallic spirit for an all-American audience."
The name is magic to an ageless but perennial public for a further adventure in stylized, wistful watercolors and charmingly imperfect rhyme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FATHER, DEAR FATHER by Ludwig Bemelmans
Released: Aug. 1, 1953

"Sudden bits of serious philosophy relieve; it of the charge of sheer insanity."
Meat for Bemelmans' fans, in the groove with How to Travel Incognito, quite mad and utterly beguiling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSEBUD by Ludwig Bemelmans
illustrated by Ludwig Bemelmans
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1942

"We miss the lilt of Madeleine and doubt that this Bemelmans will go as far."
Adult in humor is this slight story of an attenuated pink rabbit who reads in a book about animals that "The rabbit is a small rodent — scared, shy and hysterical". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1960

"For Bemelmans' followers this is a change of pace and it is not for the casual, average novel reader."
Punishments and not love are rules for the teller of this chronicle of revolt — the unnamed daughter of a French militarist, a Spanish mother, and the sister of Hugo, as unhappy as she. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON BOARD NOAH'S ARK by Ludwig Bemelmans
Released: May 18, 1962

Bemelmans is always surprising us by appearing in new roles- this time as a yachtsman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 13, 1961

"For travel book addicts as well as for the Bemelmans' fans."
A wholly unorthodox approach to touring Italy enlivened by Bemelmans' individuality and the odd angles he chooses for exploration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARSLEY by Ludwig Bemelmans
Kirkus Star
illustrated by Ludwig Bemelmans
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1955

"But they are even further benefited when a branch of the tree catches the binoculars of an unfortunate hunter- and artfully dangles them in a position that allows the animals to use them to spy future marauders of the human sort."
The happy decision to reprint the story of Old Parsley in book form (after its first appearance in Woman's Day in 1953) brings us the tale of how a gnarled pine growing on an abyss helped the animals who lived nearby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1943

"A tale, which will sell on the Bemelmans' name —particularly with the impetus of BOM selection for March."
An extravaganza of a day that is past, a day for which Bemelmans recurrently betrays a wistful affection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LA BONNE TABLE by Ludwig Bemelmans
Released: Oct. 28, 1964

"Michelin would give it three stars and five forks."
Although everything served up here has something to do with eating, this is not a cookbook and it consists of assorted autobiographical pieces about restaurateurs, head waiters or chefs or piccolos or maitres d'hotel, about hotels or innkeeping in general or guests in particular. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

QUITO EXPRESS by Ludwig Bemelmans
Released: Sept. 30, 1938

"Entertaining adventures of a baby in Ecuador — a baby who cannot resist the fascination of a train and who crawls aboard,and of how the conductor took care of him and finally found his family."
Bemelmans at his best, with enchanting pictures and a story that is better gauged for small readers (and listeners) than most of his. Read full book review >