Search Results: "Lydia Dabcovich"


BOOK REVIEW

THE KEYS TO MY KINGDOM by Lydia Dabcovich
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 1992

"A straightforward-looking presentation of an old favorite with a couple of nice extra dimensions. (Folklore/Picture book. 3-8)"
The traditional chant appears here in three languages (English, French, Spanish) and is given a new ``key'': artist's tools, wielded by a pigtailed young artist who can be found in each picture, following the route described and finally arranging the flowers in the basket and using her paints to depict what she has seen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAISIE by Alice Schertle
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 1995

"See also Anne Shelby's Homeplace (below). (Picture book. 5+)"
A novel in 32 pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANNUSHKA'S VOYAGE by Edith Tarbescu
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 21, 1998

"An author's note, with a picture of her mother and aunt, dates the tale to the late 1800s in Russia under Czar Alexander III. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Tarbescu recounts her mother's journey from Russia to America at the turn of the century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEATHERS by Ruth Gordon
adapted by Ruth Gordon, illustrated by Lydia Dabcovich
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1993

"Dabcovich's zany cartoons re-create a little piece of history in the Eastern European setting and costumes; her loose lines perfectly capture the look of bewildered trust that's standard issue in Chelm. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The good fools of Chelm are hauled out and dusted off for still more ridicule; and, unlike many retellers of their woes, Gordon provides some edifying background on how they came to be so silly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO MORE EEE-ORRH! by Lydia Monks
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"They should attract young listeners. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The braying of Dicky Donkey annoys everyone in town, but are they better off without it? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AAAARRGGHH! SPIDER! by Lydia Monks
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 30, 2004

"Monks's cartoonish illustrations are lively and offer some genuinely funny moments, but they don't save what is essentially a very lightweight story about how spiders are people, too. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The resident spider in a human family's home would much prefer to be a pet than a silent bystander, but when she tries to dance fetchingly by the couch or show how clean she is (by hanging out in the bathtub), the family screams "Aaaarrgghh! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATALYST by Lydia Kang
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 24, 2015

"Kang wraps up her duology neatly and satisfyingly, but the intrigue lingers—which is also satisfying. (Dystopian suspense. 12-18)"
In a dystopian future, a breed of genetically altered humans struggles for freedom and survival. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OMNIVORES by Lydia Millet
Released: May 7, 1996

"Perhaps next time she'll tell us something we don't already know."
Canadian first-novelist Millet debuts with an absurdist carnival lambasting modern American mores—a rollicking farce featuring a present-day damsel in distress, with nary a serious thought in evidence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW THE DEAD DREAM by Lydia Millet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"A hymn to love and an elegy for lost species, but not much of a novel."
A story of extinction from Millet (Oh Pure and Radiant Heart, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERMAIDS IN PARADISE by Lydia Millet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2014

"An admirable example of a funny novel with a serious message that works swimmingly. Dive in."
A Caribbean honeymoon turns into a media circus over a mermaid sighting in this laser-focused satire from Millet (Magnificence, 2012, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRANGENESS OF BEAUTY by Lydia Minatoya
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1999

"They don—t propel the reader forward, but they are informative."
Minatoya (the memoir Talking to High Monks in the Snow, 1992) debuts in fiction with a pleasantly told, highly detailed, risk-free, and autobiographical "I-story" of Etsuko in the years between the world wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMUEL JOHNSON IS INDIGNANT by Lydia Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Outsiders, self-doubt, and alienation: all form the bedrock upon which Davis sets up an off-kilter, edgy universe distinctly her own."
Translator, novelist, and short-fiction specialist Davis (Almost No Memory, 1997, etc.) assembles another fine collection of 54 wry, haunting pieces, old and new, brief and long, nearly all previously published. Read full book review >