Search Results: "Lydia Monks"


BOOK REVIEW

LYDIA by Brian Willson
ROMANCE
Released: March 24, 2013

"A subtle love story that rewards patient readers with its quiet charms."
In this supernatural love story, when Ed Austin purchases a 200-year-old farm in Maine, it comes with a ghost that may haunt him in all the right ways. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NO MORE EEE-ORRH! by Lydia Monks
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"They should attract young listeners. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The braying of Dicky Donkey annoys everyone in town, but are they better off without it? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AAAARRGGHH! SPIDER! by Lydia Monks
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 30, 2004

"Monks's cartoonish illustrations are lively and offer some genuinely funny moments, but they don't save what is essentially a very lightweight story about how spiders are people, too. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The resident spider in a human family's home would much prefer to be a pet than a silent bystander, but when she tries to dance fetchingly by the couch or show how clean she is (by hanging out in the bathtub), the family screams "Aaaarrgghh! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAT BARKED? by Lydia Monks
Released: April 1, 1999

"Readers will be firmly converted to the superiority of the cat's life, and pleasingly distracted by the high-wattage collage artwork. (Picture book. 3-7)"
This candy-colored tribute to cats starts with a particular cat bemoaning, in verse, its lot compared to a dog's life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE LADYBUG HEARD by Julia Donaldson
ANIMALS
Released: May 11, 2010

"Read-it-again fun. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Ten googly-eyed farm animals (cow, hen, goose, duck and others) all say just the right things ("Moo," "cluck," etc.) while the ladybug simply listens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAKING BEAUTY by Leah Wilcox
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"This irrepressible read-aloud will have the audience shouting directions at the poor hapless Prince—who could ask for a better endorsement than that? (Picture book. 3-8)"
The team that created the hysterical Falling for Rapunzel (2003) now tackles Sleeping Beauty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLING FOR RAPUNZEL by Leah Wilcox
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"And the twist on 'happily ever after' spins a reality-based meaning on the phrase 'falling for you' that kids should find funny. (Picture book/fairy tale. 5-8)"
"Once upon a bad hair day, a prince rode up Rapunzel's way." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAD DOG MCGRAW by Myron Uhlberg
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2000

"A delightful story, but children shouldn't take its lesson too seriously when dealing with strange 'mad dogs.' (Picture book. 3-8)"
Love conquers fear in a charming story about a boy and a fearsome dog. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER LYDIA by Sandra Tyler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1995

"This author is capable of better."
A disappointing second novel that again explores the mother- daughter relationship but lacks the consummate writing and insight that distinguished Blue Glass (1992). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCARIEST MONSTER IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD by Pamela Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2001

"Will appeal to monsters everywhere. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Thea Dewhickey's parents might be a couple of potato-heads, but they are also overachievers of the worst type: They overachieve for their daughter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 11, 2011

"The awareness of the firefighter, the mindfulness of the monk, the principles of fire and the spirit of Zen come together in a well-told story about the effort required and the lessons learned from paying close attention."
A former Yoga Journal senior editor's account of five Zen practitioners turned firefighters who saved a beloved California monastery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 15, 1993

"Photos, plus discography and transcriptions of songs and vaudeville skits)."
Lydia Mendoza—with 12-string guitar and soulful renditions of tangos, boleros, corridos, and other popular songs—catapulted to fame (if not fortune) as ``La Cancionera de los Pobres'' (``The Songstress of the Poor'') in the 30's Southwest, becoming the most renowned member of her performing family. Read full book review >