Search Results: "Lydia Netzer"


BOOK REVIEW

SHINE SHINE SHINE by Lydia Netzer
Released: July 17, 2012

"Talky uplift and a self-congratulatory tone bog down the novel, but through compelling characters, Netzer raises a provocative question: Is autism a disability, a gift or the norm of the future?"
Netzer's debut, about a heavily pregnant woman left to care for her dying mother and autistic son while her Nobel-winning husband travels to the moon, takes the literary concept of charmingly quirky characters to a new level. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRES BENEATH THE SEA by Lydia Millet
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2011

"A lush and intelligent opener for a topical eco-fantasy series. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
Nature and science in a vivid Cape Cod setting create layers of meaning as 13-year-old Cara and her brothers confront the puzzle of their mother's disappearance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1998

"Ch†vez skillfully shows the upside and downside to each argument and each outcome, and her ability to turn the subject of a plebiscite into a compelling, widely relevant, and instructive study is admirable."
paper 0-520-21344-0 A strong yet impartial look at the beginning of the end of affirmative action in the US, by a self-proclaimed recipient of its benefits. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASANOVA by Lydia Flem
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"A thoughtful and intelligent examination of the great lover, but more effective as analysis and literary criticism than as biography."
Flem, a Franco-Belgian psychoanalyst and author, takes a bit of a busman's holiday with this biography/critique of the 18th century's most famous rake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAVERY INC. by Lydia Cacho
NON-FICTION
Released: May 13, 2014

"It's clear that Cacho, with such passion for her subject, understands far more than her audience will. Unfortunately, she fails to make the connections for those who don't have her background knowledge."
Award-winning El Universal journalist Cacho has a history of crusading for human rights through her work. Here, she chronicles her global travels to document the world of human trafficking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAN'T AND WON'T by Lydia Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 8, 2014

"Whether fiction or non, Davis never bores."
Five years after a mammoth, comprehensive collection of stories secured her literary legacy, this unique author explores new directions and blurs boundaries in writing that is always fresh and often funny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE IN INFANT MONKEYS by Lydia Millet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Noble intent, interesting idea, disappointing execution."
Short fiction from risk-taking novelist Millet (How the Dead Dream, 2008, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOST LIGHTS by Lydia Millet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2011

"Literary fiction with a deep vein of wry social commentary."
Millet's latest opens with T (How the Dead Dream, 2009, etc.) gone missing on the Monkey River. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATALYST by Lydia Kang
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 24, 2015

"Kang wraps up her duology neatly and satisfyingly, but the intrigue lingers—which is also satisfying. (Dystopian suspense. 12-18)"
In a dystopian future, a breed of genetically altered humans struggles for freedom and survival. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VARIETIES OF DISTURBANCE by Lydia Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2007

"An initially off-putting collection that gradually becomes habit-forming."
More dauntingly opaque but often brilliant snippets and meditations from MacArthur recipient Davis (Samuel Johnson Is Indignant, 2001, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OMNIVORES by Lydia Millet
Released: May 7, 1996

"Perhaps next time she'll tell us something we don't already know."
Canadian first-novelist Millet debuts with an absurdist carnival lambasting modern American mores—a rollicking farce featuring a present-day damsel in distress, with nary a serious thought in evidence. Read full book review >