Search Results: "Lynda S. Robinson"


BOOK REVIEW

SLAYER OF GODS by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 2001

"Still, the puzzle is perfunctory, the suspects shadowy, the hero distracted throughout, and the whole enterprise disappointingly anticlimactic."
Queen Nefertiti has been dead for 11 years when the final volume of Robinson's trilogy opens, but the mortality rate continues high among those who might have the slightest clue about her murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT THE FEAST OF REJOICING by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 20, 1996

Think you've got problems when you go home for the holidays? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER AT THE GOD'S GATE by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 13, 1995

"But this sequel is still a powerfully imagined tonic for readers who say they don't like historical mysteries."
Troubled times for King Tutankhamun, who has to fend off threats from the marauding Hittites against the outlying territories of his empire and rivalry from the priests of the god Amun at home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EATER OF SOULS by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 1997

When the boy pharaoh Tutankhamen wants to know who poisoned Nefertiti, Great Royal Wife of Akhenaten, Tutankhamen's heretic predecessor on the Egyptian throne, he naturally turns to Lord Meren, his Eyes and Ears. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRINKER OF BLOOD by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1998

"Newcomers to Lord Meren's fine series of adventures are well-advised to start elsewhere."
Who killed Queen Nefertiti? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MURDER IN THE PLACE OF ANUBIS by Lynda S. Robinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"First of a promised, and promising, series."
A Tutankhamen-era mystery loosely inspired by Agatha Christie's Death Comes as the End (now, incredibly, celebrating its 50th birthday) starts with the discovery of an extra body in the embalming shelter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBINSON by Peter Sís
Kirkus Star
by Peter Sís, illustrated by Peter Sís
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"An enchanting love letter to the magic of childhood and the fertile relationship between good literature and young readers' imaginations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sís takes readers on a journey to a Slumberland-esque island that reinforces the joys of storytelling and would make Winsor McCay's Little Nemo proud. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROBINSON by Christopher Petit
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"While his evocation of a world sunk in anomie is a modest success, his character-driven story is a failure: Robinson is just too much of a hand-me-down to be convincing."
British film director Petit draws on his movie experience for his first novel—the sometimes surreal portrait of a London wheeler-dealer and his shadowy world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >