Search Results: "Lys Blakeslee"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"Good thing God forgives her—many parents would be investigating that 'spare the rod' verse. (Fiction. 5-8)"
Narrated by the self-numbered Natalie 24, an overactive five-year-old with a lot of big ideas, this Junie B. Jones knockoff packs a lot of action into a just a few pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUVENTUD by Vanessa Blakeslee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"Ambitious in the ground it covers and moving at times, but it falls short at the many hairpin plot turns."
A young girl discovers her father's shocking secret, and the course of her life changes drastically as a result. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN DARK WATER by Mermer Blakeslee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Written with a fine ear for the voice of a child, Blakeslee builds a lovely portrait and a memorable character in Eudora Buell."
Blakeslee's second (after Same Blood, 1989) offers a bittersweet account of a family in 1958 upstate New York and the toll that serious trouble takes on their ten-year-old daughter,. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 18, 2007

"Despite some flaws, a text with much to be savored—not least the upbeat message that you can take control."
Two seasoned science writers enthuse about some new wrinkles in neuroscience, and ways you can benefit from the findings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 24, 1996

"The trend is everything: Just pick one and ride it until you feel yourself click into place. (First printing of 150,000)"
Popcorn's ``click'' has nothing to do with either feminist consciousness or the PC mouse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 2004

"Ever the optimist, Hawkins considers building intelligent machines eminently doable. Given his track record, maybe he'll succeed. If not, the exercise may provide further insight into how the brain really, really works."
Hawkins, the PalmPilot's inventor, is keen to build truly intelligent machines based on his ideas of how the brain really works. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DIFFERENT KIND OF HERO by Ann R. Blakeslee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1997

In a novel that is a near-perfect combination of brutal realism and piercing lyricism, the kindhearted son of a brawling miner becomes a pariah in his lawless frontier mining town when he befriends a Chinese immigrant boy, Zi. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER BATTLES by Ann R. Blakeslee
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2000

"The Klan leader, revealed in the end to be female, doesn't quite ring true, either. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
In the summer of 1926, 11-year-old Kath spends three weeks in Peaceable, Indiana, which is anything but. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 2, 1998

"Ramachandran, who likens himself to a sleuth and has boundless curiosity, leads readers on a riveting trail of detection. (Author tour)"
Insights and intriguing speculations from a neurologist whose patients provide him with unusual opportunities to explore the brain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 14, 2015

"Never fails to bring gratuitous academic heft to the instinctive, ancient principles of simple bartering."
Business school professors attempt to teach the art of negotiation with a mix of psychology and basic economic logic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SELECTED LETTERS OF WILLIAM STYRON by William Styron
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 4, 2012

"A great read for Styron devotees, but fans of correspondence will miss the conversational quality of most letter collections."
A good portion of William Styron's personal and business correspondence brought together in one volume. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SERPENT AND THE ROSE by Kathleen Bryan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2007

"A solid debut, with believable characters and intrigues and several excellent sequences that hint at good things to come."
First of a series illustrating the endless struggle between order magic and chaos magic. Read full book review >