Search Results: "M.B. DeBevoise"


BOOK REVIEW

THE IDEA OF FRANCE by Pierre Birnbaum
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"An academic study that will be of some interest to lay readers, but likely to appeal mainly to specialists of European politics and history."
An account of modern French politics and society, from the distinguished Sorbonne philosopher Birnbaum (Jewish Destinies, 2000). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LITTLE SCHUBERT by M.B. Goffstein
Released: Nov. 1, 1972

"There's nobility in the very spareness; a lilt to the title's word play, and Schubert is, of course, the perfect subject for this doll-sized glimpse of greatness."
Minimal is the word. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NATURAL HISTORY by M.B. Goffstein
Released: June 1, 1979

"Don't believe in a grain-eating wolf till you see one."
A little paean to brotherly love, animal protection, and peace—along the lines of Ruth Krauss' The Big World and the Little House and other idealistic constructs of the Forties and Fifties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY SCRAPBOOK by M.B. Goffstein
Released: June 1, 1978

"As with a real family scrapbook, then, the oddly assorted entries will have different meaning for different members—and fond associations tucked between the lines."
A Jewish doctor who trades in the car for a pickup truck? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNDERSIDE OF THE LEAF by M.B. Goffstein
Released: April 1, 1972

"The illusions and vulnerability of adolescence are depicted with an unflinching accuracy, and young women will find this a moving and sensitive examination of the painful side of growing up."
In clinically affectless prose, the pubescent daydreams of twelve-year-old Paula as she passes a summer on the lake painting watercolors, designing clothes for paper dolls, and imagining that Tom Kadrie, her neighbor's jazz musician boyfriend, is secretly in love with her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Conductoid by M.B. Lehane

"A charming, if meandering, first entry in a proposed fantasy series featuring an exuberant young protagonist."
The hero of this YA debut novel, 11-year-old Jackson McKay, learns he has interdimensional powers—though he may just be daydreaming again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWO PIANO TUNERS by M.B. Goffstein
Released: April 15, 1970

"But Debbie is totally disarming—walking down the street thinking 'Hello, dogs, here comes the piano tuner'—for a select audience."
Not more story but more text and fewer pictures, perhaps too much text and too few pictures (holding Goldie the Dollmaker as the perfect example). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEIGHBORS by M.B. Goffstein
Released: Aug. 1, 1979

"With, of course, Goffstein's precise and eloquent line drawings as accompaniments."
Four small episodes that—in Goffstein's tenuous, tentative way—do for beingneighbors what Lobel's Frog and Toad stories do for being friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NOAH'S ARK by M.B. Goffstein
Released: Oct. 1, 1978

"But apart from the father's booming refrain—'Make it three hundred cubits long'—and the expressed fancy for one horse, the narrative hovers, unsecured; the recollection does not become a shared experience."
The idea of a Noah's ark handed down from generation to generation holds such promise, and so well suits Goffstein's precise, intimate, quietly unfolding manner, that the fact that it remains tenuous, undeveloped—as do the pictures—is all the more a disappointment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIVES OF THE ARTISTS by M.B. Goffstein
Released: March 18, 1982

"But this is the sort of anamolous object best discovered under a toadstool—or presented, knowingly, as a gift."
Poetic evocations of five artists—Rembrandt, Guardi, Van Gogh, Bonnard, Nevelson—accompanied by a painting in full color at the outset and a drawing at the close (except in the case of Nevelson's sculpture—where the pattern is tellingly reversed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAISY SUMMERFIELD'S STYLE by M.B. Goffstein
Released: Aug. 13, 1978

"It's a proper fairy tale ending, confirming for the skeptical that Daisy is an artist indeed—but by then it couldn't be dearer that the real joy is all in the getting there."
For someone whose idea of style even in 1959 is to change her first name and stick matching cardboard daisies on her luggage, Daisy Summerfield comes a long way in a short time. Read full book review >