Search Results: "Mae Besom"


BOOK REVIEW

WHAT DO YOU DO WITH A CHANCE? by Kobi Yamada
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 6, 2018

"This is a book that will grow with readers: use it to inspire conversations of a philosophical nature as well as for practical problem-solving. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Perfectionists and those with social anxiety will find encouragement in the reminder that embarrassment is temporary and even the fearful can choose to take chances. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT DO YOU DO WITH A PROBLEM? by Kobi Yamada
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2016

"A straightforward, effective approach to helping children cope with one of life's commonplace yet emotionally fraught situations, this belongs on the shelf alongside Molly Bang's Sophie books. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A child struggles with the worry and anxiety that come with an unexpected problem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 15, 2010

"A bit too impassive, but a solid contribution to Chinese American history."
A century in the saga of a Chinese American family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CRAZY LIKE A FOX by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2017

"The book begins with a multipaged cast of characters, which includes sections for humans, American foxhounds, horses, foxes (red), foxes (gray), birds, and Sister's house pets and a separate glossary of useful terms. These should help identify potential readers who will enjoy a mild mystery filled with lovingly painted details—while deterring the uninterested."
An older community of Virginians competes with exhaustively detailed descriptions of fox hunting to investigate the mysterious return of one of their own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEVENTH CHILD by Freddie Mae Baxter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 4, 1999

"Part memoir, part social history, this will make readers appreciate life's smaller moments and, yes, feel lucky. (First printing of 125,000)"
An alternatingly touching and humorous walk down memory lane that illuminates as often as it entertains. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOSE LIPS by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 13, 1999

"The frequent one-liners often seem more sitcom than novel material, going nowhere and telling less, but there are still good laughs along the way."
Brown brings back the wacky Hunsenmeir sisters attended by all the good and not-so-good folk of Runnymede (Six of One, 1978; Bingo, 1988), as middle age and war give a new edge to their chronic if overhyped sibling rivalry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOLLEY by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 1994

"Unusually prudish work sabotaged by the author's admiration for her subject. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
This pallid historical novel explores Dolley Madison's tenure as first lady, focusing in particular on the year 1814 and conflict with the British. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALMA MATER by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Sketchy characterization and desultory writing don't exactly fill in the blanks between sex scenes, and the college-lesbian romance seems awfully dated—when not embarrassingly rapturous."
Twosomes and threesomes at an ivy-covered Virginia college, from the author of Rubyfruit Jungle (1983), etc., and the popular Sneaky Pie Brown mystery series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREADS OF DECEIT by Mae Fox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 2015

"This series kickoff features a touch of romance and some interesting historical tidbits but not much exercise for your own inner sleuth."
An innkeeper gets involved in a historical dig and a modern murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SAND CASTLE by Rita Mae Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2008

"Not much happens—there's just enough incident for a substantial short story—but Brown has a great ear for the way children argue, and a keen eye for the way their childish arguments shade off into the defining conflicts of a lifetime."
Brown follows the durable Hunsenmeir sisters (Loose Lips, 1999, etc.) to the seashore, where the younger generation carries on the aimless, benign, revelatory quarreling of their midlife elders. Read full book review >