Search Results: "Marc Norman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Not just a masterful and engaging piece of film scholarship, but a gripping cultural and social history of the United States in the 20th century."
Academy Award-winning screenwriter Norman (Shakespeare in Love) enthusiastically traces the peculiar history of screenwriting in Hollywood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARC BROWN'S PLAYTIME RHYMES by Marc Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"Just right for family play, while honoring the tradition of passing these rhymes to future generations. (Picture book/poetry. 3-6)"
Twenty of Brown's favorite finger rhymes, complete with tiny pictograms to demonstrate motions and actions for each phrase. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERHERO by Marc Tauss
by Marc Tauss, photographed by Marc Tauss
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"Bravo, Maleek. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Maleek is deeply enamored of superhero comic books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONKEY NOT READY FOR THE BABY by Marc Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"There's not much new about this new-baby book. (Picture book. 3-5)"
With the help of his parents and big brother, Monkey gets ready to become a big brother, too. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

NORMAN OHLER
by Claiborne Smith

If someone asked you to guess how many books have been written about Adolf Hitler or Germany’s World War II–era army, you might think, “Do I have to?” And you would be forgiven for reacting that way: even if you don’t know the number of books, you know the tally must be overwhelming (in fact, a cursory search on ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY BIRDS by Dean Norman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"While Norman's book is pleasing and upbeat, it is only a cursory glance, lacking any real substance. (Graphic nonfiction. 6-10)"
A graphic novel tells the story of two urban falcons raising their young high upon a Midwestern edifice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPOOK THE HALLOWEEN CAT by Dean Norman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 31, 2015

"A well-meaning narrative fail. (Graphic fiction. 7-10)"
On Halloween, a series of events leads to a young girl, a helpful man, a lost cat, a friendly witch, and an excitable dog crossing paths with mixed results. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAND OF NEVERBELIEVE by Norman Messenger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 4, 2012

"For young would-be tourists as well as students of nature's more fanciful imaginary reaches, the next best thing to an actual visit. (Picture book. 7-10)"
Free-floating imagination meets artistic expertise in this visual record of the exotic flora, fauna and (more or less) human residents encountered on an unexpected visit to an elusive island. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SQUISHINESS OF THINGS by Marc Kompaneyets
ADVENTURE
Released: June 28, 2005

"Decorated with pictorial borders and elaborate, shadowy illustrations in a variety of Renaissance styles, this droll debut will appeal to readers, young or otherwise, who fancy themselves sophisticates. (Picture book. 11-13)"
Strongly influenced by Gulliver's Travels and Candide, and really written for the same audience, this visual and literary confection lampoons catalogers and other such know-it-alls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WAITING PLACE by Marc Sutherland
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A jubilant debut, half-mad and wholly invigorating. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Outrageous adventures take place at the foot of the bed when a bout of insomnia allows a child's imagination to take flight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARTHUR MEETS THE PRESIDENT by Marc Brown
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1991

"A weak link in this popular series. (Picture book. 5-8)"
``How I Can Help Make America Great'' is the subject; Arthur thinks about how much more can be done when everyone helps, then writes his essay—and wins a national contest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVELY SUMMER by Marc Simont
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1992

"A treat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A favorite illustrator (a Caldecott medalist who in 1990 reillustrated Many Moons, to wide acclaim) depicts a summer's depredations on a garden from a rabbit family's point of view: While they timidly hang back, the burly woodchuck bulls his way into the trap set for them; thereafter, they happily enjoy the vegetables, oblivious to the gardener's distress—they even mistake a parting shake of a fist at summer's end for a friendly wave. Read full book review >