Search Results: "Marc Simont"


BOOK REVIEW

MIMI by Marc Simont
Released: Nov. 3, 1954

"It is original; try it for yourself."
The more one thinks about it the sillier this story becomes, and yet as one reads one accepts the impossible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW COME ELEPHANTS? by Marc Simont
Released: Sept. 1, 1965

"A stubbornly curious younger boy asks 'why,' gets one answer and proceeds from that to 'how come' and pushes on through the variations until the answers come full circle to the original remarks about this remarkable animal."
A junior style elephant joke pokes gentle fun at the favorite juvenile question — why. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVELY SUMMER by Marc Simont
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1992

"A treat. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A favorite illustrator (a Caldecott medalist who in 1990 reillustrated Many Moons, to wide acclaim) depicts a summer's depredations on a garden from a rabbit family's point of view: While they timidly hang back, the burly woodchuck bulls his way into the trap set for them; thereafter, they happily enjoy the vegetables, oblivious to the gardener's distress—they even mistake a parting shake of a fist at summer's end for a friendly wave. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRAY DOG by Marc Simont
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 31, 2001

"Willy's a winner. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Really splendid artwork—something Caldecott Medallist Simont has been noted for in the past 60 years—sets this book skipping like a stone on water. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOSE THAT ALMOST GOT COOKED by Marc Simont
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

Emily the Canadian goose dares to be different—she is constantly breaking flight formation with fanciful flips and loop-the-loops. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONTEST AT PACA by Marc Simont
Released: April 29, 1959

"Marc Simont's story and his caricature drawing reflect the spirit of genuine satire in this fable which will delight children and entertain adults."
Marc Simont, 1956 Caldecott Winner, author and illustrator of many other beguiling books for children, sets out to prove that the pen is mightier than the sword. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POLLY'S OATS by Marc Simont
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 22, 1951

"Polly has all the mournful dignity of a Buster Keaton, and her story is a rollicking picnic of flying horse-feathers."
Some of the illustrations, by the author, of the wretched Polly will bring horse laughs others squeals of sympathy, but all will call forth chuckles and delight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLUMBER OUT OF THE SEA by Marc Simont
Released: June 15, 1955

"Not as sturdy as it might be."
A common occurrence in our work-a-day world is told and illustrated with a satisfying portion of Marc Simont's pragmatic humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BROTHER, ANT by Betsy Byars
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1996

"1277, etc.) spins the tales in dialogue, and the pace never lags; Simont provides charming scenes of the boys together. (Picture book. 5-7)"
An effective pairing of author and illustrator in a disarming Easy-to-Read entry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PHILHARMONIC GETS DRESSED by Karla Kuskin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1982

"Great fun, then, that's also an inspired approach to concert-going."
Well may you blink—but this is gloriously for real: on the cover is a woman struggling into a long black dress with an instrument case propped alongside. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FISH HEAD by Jean Fritz
Kirkus Star
by Jean Fritz, illustrated by Marc Simont
Released: June 15, 1954

"Fairly firm stitching."
A tough specimen, habituee of the wharf, Fish Head is a cat with an enviable personality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HAPPY DAY by Ruth Krauss
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 7, 1949

"Possibly a book that has more perfection to an adult than to a child, but somehow I think children will grow into it, too."
A lovely book, which scarcely needs the captions, for the idea is evident in the enchanting pictures in soft blacks and whites, with one touch of color at the end. Read full book review >