Search Results: "Marcia Brown"


BOOK REVIEW

MARCIA by John Steptoe
Released: April 26, 1976

"And, whatever we adults make of its message, Marcia—with its modified black English, sassy dialogue, and underlying earnestness—is an issue book attuned to its intended audience."
The trouble with most of the new YA novels dealing with sex is that seventeen-year-old behavior, presuming seventeen-year-old feelings, is depicted in stories read chiefly by twelve-year-olds—and, in truth, written at their level. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by Richard Rodriguez
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2002

"Elegant, controversial, and altogether memorable."
A poetic, often contrarian meditation on race in modern America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN by James Polster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Good fun, if ultimately shallow."
A rollicking, at times extremely funny, tall tale disguised as a detective novel, careening with Hunter Thompsonesque panache through the restaurants, bars, and haunts of the corrupt rich in San Francisco, that classic mystery milieu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAKEOVERS BY MARCIA by Claudia Mills
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 9, 2005

"As unblemished as a good makeover. (Fiction. 8-12)"

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 16, 1972

"The crudely contrasting colors and broad, chop-licking expressions suit this version to group consumption; close up, Holdsworth's Gingerbread Boy (1968) is more sustaining."
Cousin to the more familiar gingerbread boy, a round and smiling bun of dough and sour cream successfully evades an old woman, old man, hare, wolf, and bear before a fox, pretending interest in his boasting song, flatters him nearer and nearer. . . then "Snap! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FLYING CARPET by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1956

"Very firm spine."
One of the 1001 tales from the Arabian Nights- the story of the Princes Husayn, Ali and Ahmad and their quest for the hand of Princess Nur-al Nihar- is retold with a direct simplicity from the Burton translation and illustrated in swirling, glowing eastern line and color by Miss Brown. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIPPER JOHN'S COOK by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1951

"Second and third year reading."
By the author of Dick Whittington and His Cat (1950) and Henry-Fisherman (1949) a delightful sea and salt air picture book about a cocky Provincetown boy who shipped out as a cook for the crew of a bean-weary fishing boat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENRY-FISHERMAN by Marcia Brown
Released: June 15, 1949

"Henry is a little dark skinned native boy, and the story of his daily round, of his aspirations to go out with his father in the fishing boat, and of what happens when he finally goes, is told with the lilt of the islanders' language, and a confident feel of background, and use of the details children like to know about distant places."
Picture book format with too much text for the picture story book age, so try in this section. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEIGHBORS by Marcia Brown
Released: Oct. 1, 1967

"It's nicely told but doesn't bear watching."
From the back of a classroom, these Strident, overscaled, hyperactive illustrations might look just great; at close range they're almost uniformly grotesque. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PETER PIPER'S ALPHABET by Marcia Brown
Released: Aug. 5, 1959

"Illustrated in vivid color drawings by Marcia Brown which capture the abandon of the one hundred and forty year old English text, this book teaches its valuable lesson through whimsy and inventiveness."
Based on the Peter Piper rhyme, this book takes the reader on a colorful tour of his alphabet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DICK WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT by Marcia Brown
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 14, 1950

"More or less of a carriage trade item."
Hanso cuts — stylized with a witty flair-enliven the beloved old story of the cat and the balls that called Dick Whittington back to London. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLUE JACKAL by Marcia Brown
Released: March 31, 1977

"But the punch is here, and Brown's emphatic prints—her hellish dogs, her dynamic and elegant jungle court—magnify the impact."
It's been done before as a picture book, this story from the Panchatantra about a jackal who hides from dogs in a vat of blue dye and then, seeing that the other animals are awed by his strange appearance, makes himself their king. Read full book review >